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L'impact de la Maternité sur l'Activité des Femmes aux Etats-Unis

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  • Hélène Périvier

Abstract

RESUME :Aux Etats-Unis, durant les décennies 1970 et 1980, l’entrée massive des mères en couple sur le marché du travail a permis d’alimenter la croissance de l’activité féminine ;durant la décennie suivante, la participation des mères isolées a pris le relais sous l’impulsion des réformes de l’aide sociale au milieu des années 1990. Malgré ces tendances générales, la maternité pèse toujours sur les trajectoires professionnelles des femmes. L’environnement institutionnel américain peu favorable à l’équilibre entre vies familiale et professionnelle explique en partie cette pénalité que subissent les mères relativement aux hommes et aux femmes sans enfant.

Suggested Citation

  • Hélène Périvier, 2008. "L'impact de la Maternité sur l'Activité des Femmes aux Etats-Unis," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 51(2/3), pages 221-242.
  • Handle: RePEc:bxr:bxrceb:2013/112536
    Note: Numéro spécial "Parentalité et emploi" décembre 2008, Editrice :Danièle Meulders
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    United States; Maternity; Labor force; Gender gap;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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