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Parental Leave Policies in 21 Countries: Assessing Generosity and Gender Equality

Author

Listed:
  • Rebecca Ray
  • Janet C. Gornick
  • John Schmitt

Abstract

This report examines the parental leave policies in 21 high-income nations and identifies five "best practices" for parental leave policies. The study shows that the U.S. has the least generous leave policies of the 21 countries examined in the report. The states exhibiting the five best practices include Finland, France, Greece, Norway, Spain, and Sweden.

Suggested Citation

  • Rebecca Ray & Janet C. Gornick & John Schmitt, 2008. "Parental Leave Policies in 21 Countries: Assessing Generosity and Gender Equality," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2008-23, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
  • Handle: RePEc:epo:papers:2008-23
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    File URL: http://www.cepr.net/documents/publications/parental_2008_09.pdf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hélène Périvier, 2008. "L'impact de la Maternité sur l'Activité des Femmes aux Etats-Unis," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 51(2/3), pages 221-242.
    2. Heather Boushey, 2013. "The role of the government in work–family conflict in the US," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 19, pages 307-322 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Boll, Christina & Leppin, Julian Sebastian & Reich, Nora, 2011. "Einfluss der Elternzeit von Vätern auf die familiale Arbeitsteilung im internationalen Vergleich," HWWI Policy Papers 59, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
    4. Thomas Hansen, 2012. "Parenthood and Happiness: a Review of Folk Theories Versus Empirical Evidence," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 108(1), pages 29-64, August.
    5. World Bank, 2010. "Arab Republic of Egypt : Gender assessment 2010," World Bank Other Operational Studies 3003, The World Bank.
    6. Samuel Cameron & Mark Fox, 2011. "Half Full or Half Empty: The Economics of Work–Life Balance," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Economics of Leisure, chapter 6 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Karimi, Arizo & Lindahl, Erica & Skogman Thoursie, Peter, 2012. "Labour Supply Responses to Paid Parental Leave," Working Paper Series, Center for Labor Studies 2012:20, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    8. John Schmitt, 2012. "Low-wage Lessons," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2012-03, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
    9. Ann Bartel & Maya Rossin-Slater & Christopher Ruhm & Jenna Stearns & Jane Waldfogel, 2015. "Paid Family Leave, Fathers’ Leave-Taking, and Leave-Sharing in Dual-Earner Households," NBER Working Papers 21747, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Lorenzo Escot & José Fernández-Cornejo & Carlos Poza, 2014. "Fathers’ Use of Childbirth Leave in Spain. The Effects of the 13-Day Paternity Leave," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 33(3), pages 419-453, June.
    11. Roxana Gutiérrez-Romero, 2012. "Determinants of Spanish Firms' Life Cycle and Job Creation: A Pseudo-Panel Approach," Working Papers wpdea1209, Department of Applied Economics at Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona.
    12. Helene Jorgensen & Eileen Appelbaum, 2014. "Documenting the Need for a National Paid Family and Medical Leave Program: Evidence from the 2012 FMLA Survey," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2014-10, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    parental leave;

    JEL classification:

    • J - Labor and Demographic Economics
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy
    • J8 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards
    • J88 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Public Policy
    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs
    • J33 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Compensation Packages; Payment Methods
    • J38 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Public Policy

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