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Some Econometric Issues in Convergence Regressions

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  • Adriana Di Liberto

    (Universitý di Cagliari and University College London)

  • James Symons

Abstract

Despite the abundance of different econometric techniques introduced in the empirical literature on convergence, it is usually assumed that shocks are uncorrelated across countries. This is unlikely for most of the data sets considered and we investigate a possibility so far ignored, namely the annual panel estimator where shocks are allowed to be correlated. Our analysis is restricted to the case of T > N which allows us to estimate by maximum likelihood with an unrestricted variance-covariance matrix of cross-country shocks. We examine by Monte Carlo robustness against certain possible misspecifications, namely measurement error and heterogeneity of the convergence coefficients. Copyright 2003 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and The Victoria University of Manchester.

Suggested Citation

  • Adriana Di Liberto & James Symons, 2003. "Some Econometric Issues in Convergence Regressions," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 71(3), pages 293-307, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:manchs:v:71:y:2003:i:3:p:293-307
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Durlauf, Steven N. & Quah, Danny T., 1999. "The new empirics of economic growth," Handbook of Macroeconomics,in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 4, pages 235-308 Elsevier.
    2. Malcolm Knight & Norman Loayza & Delano Villanueva, 1993. "Testing the Neoclassical Theory of Economic Growth: A Panel Data Approach," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 40(3), pages 512-541, September.
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    4. Lee, Kevin & Pesaran, M Hashem & Smith, Ron, 1997. "Growth and Convergence in Multi-country Empirical Stochastic Solow Model," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(4), pages 357-392, July-Aug..
    5. Pesaran, M. Hashem & Smith, Ron, 1995. "Estimating long-run relationships from dynamic heterogeneous panels," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 79-113, July.
    6. Grubb, David & Symons, James, 1987. "Bias in Regressions With a Lagged Dependent Variable," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 3(03), pages 371-386, June.
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    8. Nickell, Stephen J, 1981. "Biases in Dynamic Models with Fixed Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(6), pages 1417-1426, November.
    9. Robertson, D & Symons, J, 1992. "Some Strange Properties of Panel Data Estimators," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 7(2), pages 175-189, April-Jun.
    10. Nazrul Islam, 1995. "Growth Empirics: A Panel Data Approach," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(4), pages 1127-1170.
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    Cited by:

    1. Adriana Di Liberto & Roberto Mura & Francesco Pigliaru, 2003. "A panel technique for the analysis of technology convergence: The case of the Italian regions," ERSA conference papers ersa03p293, European Regional Science Association.
    2. A. Di Liberto, 2004. "Convergence clubs and the role of human capital in Spanish Regional Growth," Working Paper CRENoS 200418, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.
    3. Di Liberto, Adriana, 2008. "Education and Italian regional development," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 94-107, February.
    4. Próchniak, Mariusz & Witkowski, Bartosz, 2013. "Time stability of the beta convergence among EU countries: Bayesian model averaging perspective," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 322-333.
    5. Robertson, Donald & Symons, James, 2000. "Factor residuals in SUR regressions: estimating panels allowing for cross sectional correlation," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20163, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    6. Panagiotis Artelaris & Paschalis A. Arvanitidis & George Petrakos, 2011. "Convergence patterns in the world economy: exploring the nonlinearity hypothesis," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 38(3), pages 236-252, August.
    7. R. Naylor, 2001. "Industry profits and market size under bilateral oligopoly," Working Paper CRENoS 200108, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.
    8. R. Naylor, 2001. "Firm profits and the number of firms under unionised oligopoly," Working Paper CRENoS 200109, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.

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