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Factor residuals in SUR regressions: estimating panels allowing for cross sectional correlation

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  • Robertson, Donald
  • Symons, James

Abstract

This paper describes a method for estimating panels by imposing a factor structure on the residuals. The method allows SUR estimation of panel models by providing a full-rank estimator of the system covariance matrix when the usual estimate is rank-deficient. We charactersie completely the circumstances when this is possible. When the usual estimator is of full rank, our procedure provides a more parsimonious representation of the covariance matrix, which can lead to efficiency gains in finite samples. Monte Carlo analysis of convergence regressions and PPP regressions in the Heston-Summers data-set indicates that the proposed estimator has better performance in terms of RMSE and bias than standard panel or SUR estimators (where available), as well as offering unbiased inference.

Suggested Citation

  • Robertson, Donald & Symons, James, 2000. "Factor residuals in SUR regressions: estimating panels allowing for cross sectional correlation," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20163, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:20163
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lee, K. & Psaran, M.H. & Smith, R., 1995. "Growth and Convergence: A Multi-Country Empirical Analysis of the Solow Growth Model," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 9531, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
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    6. Caselli, Francesco & Esquivel, Gerardo & Lefort, Fernando, 1996. "Reopening the Convergence Debate: A New Look at Cross-Country Growth Empirics," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 1(3), pages 363-389, September.
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    8. Conley, T. G., 1999. "GMM estimation with cross sectional dependence," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 92(1), pages 1-45, September.
    9. Adriana Di Liberto & James Symons, 2003. "Some Econometric Issues in Convergence Regressions," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 71(3), pages 293-307, June.
    10. Nazrul Islam, 1995. "Growth Empirics: A Panel Data Approach," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(4), pages 1127-1170.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Coakley, Jerry & Fuertes, Ana-Maria & Smith, Ron, 2006. "Unobserved heterogeneity in panel time series models," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 50(9), pages 2361-2380, May.
    2. Pesaran, H.M., 2003. "Estimation and Inference in Large Heterogeneous Panels with Cross Section Dependence," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0305, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    3. Arnab Bhattacharjee & Sean Holly, 2013. "Understanding Interactions in Social Networks and Committees," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 23-53.
    4. Pesaran, M. Hashem & Tosetti, Elisa, 2011. "Large panels with common factors and spatial correlation," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 161(2), pages 182-202, April.
    5. A. Di Liberto, 2004. "Convergence clubs and the role of human capital in Spanish Regional Growth," Working Paper CRENoS 200418, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.
    6. M. Hashem Pesaran, 2006. "Estimation and Inference in Large Heterogeneous Panels with a Multifactor Error Structure," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 74(4), pages 967-1012, July.
    7. Hsiao, C. & Pesaran, M.H., 2004. "‘Random Coefficient Panel Data Models’," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0434, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    8. Azzam, Islam, 2010. "Stock exchange demutualization and performance," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 211-222.
    9. Moscone, F. & Tosetti, E., 2010. "Testing for error cross section independence with an application to US health expenditure," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(5), pages 283-291, September.
    10. Bin Peng & Giovanni Forchini, 2012. "Consistent Estimation of Panel Data Models with a Multi-factor Error Structure," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0112, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    11. Manfred W. Keil & Donald Robertson & James Symons, 2001. "Minimum Wages and Employment," Claremont Colleges Working Papers 2001-08, Claremont Colleges.
    12. Burgess, Simon & Turon, Hélène, 2000. "Unemployment Dynamics, Duration and Equilibrium: Evidence from Britain," CEPR Discussion Papers 2490, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    13. Sarafidis, Vasilis & Yamagata, Takashi & Robertson, Donald, 2009. "A test of cross section dependence for a linear dynamic panel model with regressors," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 148(2), pages 149-161, February.
    14. Sarafidis, Vasilis, 2009. "GMM Estimation of Short Dynamic Panel Data Models With Error Cross-Sectional Dependence," MPRA Paper 25176, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Jushan Bai & Chihwa Kao, 2005. "On the Estimation and Inference of a Panel Cointegration Model with Cross-Sectional Dependence," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 75, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Panel data; cross sectional correlation; factor analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics

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