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Family Networks and Orphan Caretaking in Tanzania

Author

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  • Christopher Ksoll

Abstract

This paper studies the effects of orphanhood on health and education outcomes of children in Tanzania. Using an original dataset on members of the extended family networks of orphaned children, I assess by how much the effects of orphanhood are reduced due to a systematic placement of the orphans within the family network. I find that orphanhood has significant negative impacts on female orphans` welfare in terms of health and education, not however for male orphans. I then provide evidence that the selection of caretakers reduces the negative impact of orphanhood on years of education by one year relative to caretaking by the average family within the family network.

Suggested Citation

  • Christopher Ksoll, 2007. "Family Networks and Orphan Caretaking in Tanzania," Economics Series Working Papers 361, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxf:wpaper:361
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    File URL: http://www.economics.ox.ac.uk/materials/working_papers/paper361.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Anne Case & Cally Ardington, 2004. "The impact of parental death on school enrollment and achievement: Longitudinal evidence from South Africa," SALDRU/CSSR Working Papers 097, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    7. Kathleen Beegle & Joachim De Weerdt & Stefan Dercon, 2008. "Adult Mortality and Consumption Growth in the Age of HIV/AIDS," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 56, pages 299-326.
    8. David Evans & Edward Miguel, 2007. "Orphans and schooling in africa: a longitudinal analysis," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 44(1), pages 35-57, February.
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    13. Richard Akresh, 2005. "Risk, Network Quality, and Family Structure: Child Fostering Decisions in Burkina Faso," Working Papers 902, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
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    Cited by:

    1. Francesco Strobbe & Claudia Olivetti & Mireille Jacobson, 2010. "Breaking the Net: Family Structure and Street Children in Zambia," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 11110, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
    2. Olsson, Jeanette, 2016. "Violence against children who have left home, lived on the street and been domestic workers — A study of reintegrated children in Kagera Region, Tanzania," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 233-240.
    3. Kathleen Beegle & Joachim De Weerdt & Stefan Dercon, 2006. "Orphanhood and the Long-Run Impact on Children," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 88(5), pages 1266-1272.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Orphans; Extended Family; Caregiving; Tanzania;

    JEL classification:

    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure

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