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Death and Schooling Decisions over the Short and Long Run in Rural Madagascar

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  • Jean-Noël SENNE

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Abstract

This paper provides strong evidence that adult mortality has a negative impacton children education outcomes, both over the short and the long run, in ruralMadagascar. The underlying longitudinal data set and the di erence-in-di erencesstrategy used overcome most of the previous cross-section studies limitations, suchas failure to control for child and household pre-death characteristics and unob-served heterogeneity. This paper also pays special attention to the heterogeneityand robustness of the e ects estimated. Using a three year panel of school-agedchildren, our results show that orphans are 20% less likely to attend school the yearfollowing death than their non-orphaned counterparts. This e ect is even more pro-nounced for girls, young orphans and children from relatively poorer households.Pushing further the analysis to a sample of adults, our results show that those whobecame orphans in their childhood completed on average one year of educationless. These findings suggest that, in a context where resources are scarce and for-mal insurance and market mechanisms are failing, not only do households su eringunexpected shocks resort to children schooling adjustments as an immediate riskcoping strategy

Suggested Citation

  • Jean-Noël SENNE, 2010. "Death and Schooling Decisions over the Short and Long Run in Rural Madagascar," Working Papers 2010-53, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
  • Handle: RePEc:crs:wpaper:2010-53
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Huong Thu Le & Ha Trong Nguyen, 2015. "Parental health and children’s cognitive and non-cognitive development: New evidence from the Longitudinal Survey of Australian Children," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1506, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    2. Esteban García-Miralles & Miriam Gensowski, 2020. "Are Children's Socio-Emotional Skills Shaped by Parental Health Shocks?," CEBI working paper series 20-21, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. The Center for Economic Behavior and Inequality (CEBI).
    3. Isabelle Chort & Philippe De Vreyer & Thomas Zuber, 2017. "Gendered internal migration patterns in Senegal," Working Papers DT/2017/02, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    4. Rafael Novella & Claire Zanuso, 2018. "Reallocating children’s time: coping strategies after the 2010 Haiti earthquake," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 8(1), pages 1-32, December.
    5. Otrachshenko, Vladimir & Popova, Olga & Solomin, Pavel, 2017. "Health Consequences of the Russian Weather," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 132(C), pages 290-306.
    6. De Vreyer, Philippe & Nilsson, Björn, 2019. "When solidarity fails: Heterogeneous effects on children from adult deaths in Senegalese households," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 73-94.
    7. Lim, Sung Soo, 2020. "Parental chronic illness and child education: Evidence from children in Indonesia," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 73(C).
    8. Villar, Paola, 2021. "Paternal mortality, early marriages, and marital trajectories in Senegal," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 142(C).
    9. Huong Thu Le & Ha Trong Nguyen, 2017. "Parental health and children's cognitive and noncognitive development: New evidence from the longitudinal survey of Australian children," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(12), pages 1767-1788, December.
    10. Camille Saint-Macary, 2018. "Le suivi des dynamiques de pauvreté en milieu rural : retour d'expérience des observatoires ruraux à Madagascar," Post-Print hal-03361461, HAL.
    11. Ida Lykke Kristiansen, 2021. "Consequences of serious parental health events on child mental health and educational outcomes," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(8), pages 1772-1817, August.
    12. Andrea M. Mühlenweg & Franz G. Westermaier & Brant Morefield, 2016. "Parental health and child behavior: evidence from parental health shocks," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 577-598, September.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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