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Enduring Gendered Mobility Patterns in Contemporary Senegal

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  • Isabelle Chort

    () (UPPA - Université de Pau et des Pays de l'Adour, CATT - Centre d'Analyse Théorique et de Traitement des données économiques - UPPA - Université de Pau et des Pays de l'Adour)

  • Philippe de Vreyer

    (LEDa - Laboratoire d'Economie de Dauphine - Université Paris Dauphine-PSL - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres, DIAL - Développement, institutions et analyses de long terme)

  • Thomas Zuber

    (Colombia University - Columbia Mailman School of Public Health)

Abstract

This study explores internal migration patterns of men and women using individual panel data from a nationally representative survey collected in two waves, in 2006-2007 and 2010-2012, in Senegal. The data used are unique in that they contain the GPS coordinates of individuals' location in both waves. We are thus able to precisely calculate distances and map individual moves, avoiding limitations and constraints of migration definitions based on administrative units. Our results reveal major differences across gender. Women are found to be more likely to migrate than men. However, they move less far and are more likely to migrate to rural areas, especially when originating from rural areas. Education is found to increase the likelihood of migration to urban destinations, especially for women. An analysis of the motives for migrating confirms the existence of gendered migration patterns, as female mobility is mostly linked to marriage while labor mobility is frequently observed for men.

Suggested Citation

  • Isabelle Chort & Philippe de Vreyer & Thomas Zuber, 2018. "Enduring Gendered Mobility Patterns in Contemporary Senegal," Working Papers hal-02141053, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:hal-02141053
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal-univ-pau.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-02141053
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Orkoh, Emmanuel & Stolzenburg, Victor, 2020. "Gender-specific differences in geographical mobility: Evidence from Ghana," WTO Staff Working Papers ERSD-2020-01, World Trade Organization (WTO), Economic Research and Statistics Division.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Internal Migration; Gender Inequalities; Rural-Urban Migration; Senegal;

    JEL classification:

    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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