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Child fostering in Senegal

Listed author(s):
  • Simon Beck
  • Philippe De Vreyer

    (DIAL - Développement, institutions et analyses de long terme)

  • Sylvie Lambert

    (PSE - Paris School of Economics, PSE - Paris-Jourdan Sciences Economiques - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - École des Ponts ParisTech (ENPC))

  • Karine Marazyan

    (IEDES)

  • Abla Safir

    (LEA - Laboratoire d'Economie Appliquée - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, CREST - Centre de Recherche en Économie et Statistique - INSEE - École Nationale de la Statistique et de l'Administration Économique, PSE - Paris School of Economics)

This paper is about child fostering in Senegal, a practice widespread in Sub-Saharan Africa whereby children are temporarily sent to live with a host family. Using a rich household survey conducted in Senegal in 2006-7, the paper aims at describing the selection into fostering of both households and children and at examining the impact of fostering on the well-being of children (host, foster- and siblings left behind) measured through their school enrollment, labour and domestic work. Results suggest a wide heterogeneity among foster children, inducing differences in their well-being. The main sources of such heterogeneity come from the child’s gender and his duration of stay in the host household. Whether the fostering has been formally arranged between parents also seems to matter. Results are reassuring regarding the well-being of fostered children relative to their host siblings, even if they might not fare as well as children not involved in fostering. On average, education and labour outcomes of foster children are not different from those of their host siblings. In particular, results do not support the idea that fostered girls might be overloaded with domestic tasks: they do not seem to spend more time at it than their host sisters.

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Paper provided by HAL in its series Post-Print with number halshs-01379304.

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Length:
Date of creation: 2015
Publication status: Published in Journal of Comparative Family Studies, University of Calgary, Department of Sociology, 2015, 46, pp.57-73
Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-01379304
Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01379304
Contact details of provider: Web page: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/

References listed on IDEAS
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  1. Philippe Devreyer & Abla Safir & Momar B. Sylla & Sylvie Lambert, 2008. "Pauvreté et Structure Familiale: Pourquoi une nouvelle enquête ?," Post-Print halshs-00824780, HAL.
  2. Karine Marazyan, 2015. "Resource Allocation in Extended Sibships: An Empirical Investigation for Senegal," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 24(3), pages 416-452.
  3. repec:dau:papers:123456789/10922 is not listed on IDEAS
  4. Richard Akresh, 2009. "Flexibility of Household Structure: Child Fostering Decisions in Burkina Faso," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(4).
  5. Castle, Sarah E., 1995. "Child fostering and children's nutritional outcomes in rural Mali: The role of female status in directing child transfers," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 40(5), pages 679-693, March.
  6. Akresh, Richard, 2004. "Adjusting Household Structure: School Enrollment Impacts of Child Fostering in Burkina Faso," IZA Discussion Papers 1379, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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