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Is it what you inherited or what you learnt ? Intergenerational linkage and interpersonal inequality in Senegal

Author

Listed:
  • Lambert, Sylvie
  • Ravallion, Martin
  • van de Walle, Dominique

Abstract

Institutional features of the African setting -- large extended families and imperfect credit and land markets -- matter to the equity and efficiency roles played by intergenerational linkages. Using original survey data on Senegal that include an individualized measure of consumption, this paper studies the role played by land inheritance, other bequests and parental background as influences on an adult's economic welfare and economic activities. Although intergenerational linkages are evident, the analysis finds a seemingly high degree of mobility across generations, associated with the shift from farm to non-farm sectors and the greater economic activity of women. Male-dominated bequests of land and housing bring little gain to mean consumption and play little role in explaining inequality, although they have effects on the sector of activity. Inheritance of non-land assets and the education and occupation of parents (especially the mother) and their choices about children's schooling are more important to adult welfare than property inheritance. Significant gender inequality in consumption is evident, although it is almost entirely explicable in terms of factors such as education and (non-land) inheritance. There are a number of other pronounced gender differences, with intergenerational linkages coming through the mother rather than the father.

Suggested Citation

  • Lambert, Sylvie & Ravallion, Martin & van de Walle, Dominique, 2011. "Is it what you inherited or what you learnt ? Intergenerational linkage and interpersonal inequality in Senegal," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5658, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5658
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    5. Jonna P. Estudillo & JAgnes R. Quisumbing & JoKeijiro Otsuka, 2001. "Gender Differences in Land Inheritance and Schooling Investments in the Rural Philippines," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 77(1), pages 130-143.
    6. M. Anne Hill & Elizabeth King, 1995. "Women's education and economic well-being," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(2), pages 21-46.
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    8. Roy, Sanchari, 2011. "Empowering Women: Inheritance Rights and Female Education in India," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 46, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
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    Cited by:

    1. Goensch, Iris, 2013. "Does the availability of secondary schools increase primary schooling? Empirical evidence from northern Senegal," Discussion Papers 63, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Center for international Development and Environmental Research (ZEU).

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    Keywords

    Population Policies; Gender and Law; Agricultural Knowledge&Information Systems; Rural Development Knowledge&Information Systems; Gender and Health;

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