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Gender Differences in Land Inheritance and Schooling Investments in the Rural Philippines

  • Jonna P. Estudillo
  • JAgnes R. Quisumbing
  • JoKeijiro Otsuka

This paper examines the preferences of parents with respect to the allocation of land and investments in schooling between sons and daughters in two generations of households in the rural Philippines. In the older generation, better-educated fathers prefer to invest in sons’ schooling, while land-owning mothers preferentially bestow land to daughters. While gender preference in relation to parental resources has disappeared in the child generation, sons are preferred with respect to land inheritance, while daughters are treated more favorably in schooling investments.

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File URL: http://le.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/77/1/130
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Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Land Economics.

Volume (Year): 77 (2001)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 130-143

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:77:y:2001:i:1:p:130-143
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://le.uwpress.org/

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  1. Geeta Gandhi Kingdon, 1998. "Does the labour market explain lower female schooling in India?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(1), pages 39-65.
  2. O'Neill, June & Polachek, Solomon, 1993. "Why the Gender Gap in Wages Narrowed in the 1980s," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(1), pages 205-28, January.
  3. Quisumbing, Agnes R., 1994. "Intergenerational transfers in Philippine rice villages : Gender differences in traditional inheritance customs," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 167-195, April.
  4. Melissa Binder, 1998. "Family background, gender and schooling in Mexico," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(2), pages 54-71.
  5. Duncan Thomas, 1990. "Intra-Household Resource Allocation: An Inferential Approach," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 25(4), pages 635-664.
  6. Robert Kaestner, 1997. "Are Brothers Really Better? Sibling Sex Composition and Educational Achievement Revisited," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 32(2), pages 250-284.
  7. Lillard, L.A. & Willis, R.J., 1995. "Intergenerational Educational Mobility, Effects of Family and State in Malaysia," Papers 95-02, RAND - Reprint Series.
  8. Otsuka, Keijiro, 1991. "Determinants and consequences of land reform implementation in the Philippines," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 339-355, April.
  9. Anil B. Deolalikar, 1993. "Gender Differences in the Returns to Schooling and in School Enrollment Rates in Indonesia," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(4), pages 899-932.
  10. Robert M. Hauser & Hsiang-Hui Daphne Kuo, 1998. "Does the Gender Composition of Sibships Affect Women's Educational Attainment?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(3), pages 644-657.
  11. Deolalikar, A.B., 1993. "gender Differences in the Returns to School Enrollment rates in Indonesia," Working Papers 93-04, University of Washington, Department of Economics.
  12. Davies, James B & Zhang, Junsen, 1995. "Gender Bias, Investments in Children, and Bequests," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 36(3), pages 795-818, August.
  13. Kao, Charng & Polachek, Solomon W & Wunnava, Phanindra V, 1994. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Taiwan: A Human Capital Approach," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 42(2), pages 351-74, January.
  14. Wim P. M. Vijverberg, 1993. "Educational Investments and Returns for Women and Men in Côte d'Ivoire," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(4), pages 933-974.
  15. Andrew D. Foster & Mark R. Rosenzweig, 1993. "Information, Learning, and Wage Rates in Low-Income Rural Areas," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(4), pages 759-790.
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