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Measuring educational inequalities:A method and an application to Albania

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  • Nathalie Picard

    () (THEMA, Université de Cergy-Pontoise, France and INED, Paris, France.)

  • François-Charles Wolff

    () (LEN, Université de Nantes, BP 52231 Chemin de la Censive du Tertre, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3, France; CNAV and INED, Paris, France.)

Abstract

In this paper, we investigate whether educational inequalities stem rather from differences between families or within families. In a poor economy, schooling is costly for parents and education is likely to be unequally distributed among siblings. Drawing on discrete ordered choice models, we present a simple method to estimate the between and within components of both the explained and unexplained variances of education. For our empirical analysis, we use the LSMS survey conducted in 2002 in Albania. We explain about 40% of the total variance and find that inequalities in education are mainly due to differences between families. Differences within family are lower and far less easily explained.

Suggested Citation

  • Nathalie Picard & François-Charles Wolff, 2007. "Measuring educational inequalities:A method and an application to Albania," THEMA Working Papers 2007-21, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
  • Handle: RePEc:ema:worpap:2007-21
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sheshinski, Eytan & Weiss, Yoram, 1982. "Inequality within and between Families," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(1), pages 105-127, February.
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    9. Ashenfelter, Orley & Krueger, Alan B, 1994. "Estimates of the Economic Returns to Schooling from a New Sample of Twins," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 1157-1173.
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    11. Robert Kaestner, 1997. "Are Brothers Really Better? Sibling Sex Composition and Educational Achievement Revisited," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 32(2), pages 250-284.
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    13. Ashenfelter, Orley & Krueger, Alan B, 1994. "Estimates of the Economic Returns to Schooling from a New Sample of Twins," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 1157-1173.
    14. Paul Glewwe, 2002. "Schools and Skills in Developing Countries: Education Policies and Socioeconomic Outcomes," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, pages 436-482.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lucia Mangiavacchi, 2016. "Family structure and children’s educational attainment in transition economies," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 303-303.
    2. Palma, André de & Lindsey, Robin & Picard, Nathalie, 2015. "Trip-timing decisions and congestion with household scheduling preferences," Economics of Transportation, Elsevier, pages 118-131.
    3. repec:bla:afrdev:v:29:y:2017:i:2:p:223-236 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Nathalie Picard & François-Charles Wolff, 2014. "Les inégalités intrafamiliales d'éducation en France," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 65(6), pages 813-840.
    5. Richard Mussa, 2015. "Intrahousehold and Interhousehold Child Nutrition Inequality in Malawi," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 83(1), pages 140-153, March.
    6. Tien Manh Vu, 2012. "Are daughters always the losers in the chore war? Evidence using household and twin data from Vietnam," OSIPP Discussion Paper 12E002, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Education; intra-household inequality; random effects ordered Probit models; siblings;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education

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