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Family background, gender and schooling in Mexico

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  • Melissa Binder

Abstract

This article is organised around two enquiries concerning the determinants of schooling attainment in Mexico. The first explores the importance of parental schooling for children's educational attainment, which is a near-universal finding in the literature. Even after controlling for usually unobserved family characteristics such as desired schooling, parental schooling continues to exert a strong influence on children's attainment. The second enquiry examines differences in determinants of schooling for boys and girls. Schooling attainment for boys appears to be more sensitive to their number of siblings, household wealth and parent's desired schooling. Girls' schooling depends relatively more on birth order and family structure.

Suggested Citation

  • Melissa Binder, 1998. "Family background, gender and schooling in Mexico," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(2), pages 54-71.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:35:y:1998:i:2:p:54-71
    DOI: 10.1080/00220389808422564
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Chesnokova Tatyana & Vaithianathan Rhema, 2008. "Lucky Last? Intra-Sibling Allocation of Child Labor," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 8(1), pages 1-30, July.
    2. Akresh, Richard & Edmonds, Eric V., 2010. "The Analytical Returns to Measuring a Detailed Household Roster," IZA Discussion Papers 4759, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Shirantha Heenkenda & D.P.S Chandrakumara, 2015. "A Canonical Analysis on the Relationship between Financial Risk Tolerance and Household Education Investment in Sri Lanka," International Journal of Innovation and Economic Development, Inovatus Services Ltd., vol. 1(4), pages 7-23, October.
    4. Richard Akresh & Emilie Bagby & Damien de Walque & Harounan Kazianga, 2012. "Child Ability and Household Human Capital Investment Decisions in Burkina Faso," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 61(1), pages 157-186.
    5. Jonna P. Estudillo & JAgnes R. Quisumbing & JoKeijiro Otsuka, 2001. "Gender Differences in Land Inheritance and Schooling Investments in the Rural Philippines," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 77(1), pages 130-143.
    6. Ira N. Gang & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2000. "Is Child like Parent? Educational Attainment and Ethnic Origin," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 35(3), pages 550-569.
    7. Spohr, Chris A., 2003. "Formal schooling and workforce participation in a rapidly developing economy: evidence from "compulsory" junior high school in Taiwan," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(2), pages 291-327, April.
    8. Olanrewaju Olaniyan, 2011. "The Determinants of Child Schooling in Nigeria," Research Papers RP_217, African Economic Research Consortium.
    9. FJ Zimmerman, 2001. "Determinants Of School Enrollment And Performance In Bulgaria: The Role Of Income Among The Poor And Rich," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 19(1), pages 87-98, January.
    10. Ingrid Nielsen & Berenice Nyland & Chris Nyland & Russell Smyth & Mingqiong Zhang, 2006. "Determinants Of School Attendance Among Migrant Children: Survey Evidence From China'S Jiangsu Province," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 11(4), pages 461-476, December.
    11. Gitter, Seth R. & Barham, Bradford L., 2007. "Credit, Natural Disasters, Coffee, and Educational Attainment in Rural Honduras," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 498-511, March.

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