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Determinants Of School Enrollment And Performance In Bulgaria: The Role Of Income Among The Poor And Rich

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  • FJ Zimmerman

Abstract

Where credit markers are incomplete, households must finance educational investments out of past savings or current earnings. Poor households, with low savings and low current income, may accordingly be highly constrained in their educational choices, whereas richer households are not. The commonly used log-expenditures specification of the relationship of income to school enrollment may therefore be imprecise. Using data from the 1995 Bulgarian Integrated Household Survey, this analysis shows that the roughly 50% of Bulgarian households with expenditures per adult-equivalent of less than 5,000 Leva (1995 prices) are financially constrained in their educational choices, while richer households are not. Copyright 2001 Western Economic Association International.

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  • FJ Zimmerman, 2001. "Determinants Of School Enrollment And Performance In Bulgaria: The Role Of Income Among The Poor And Rich," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 19(1), pages 87-98, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:19:y:2001:i:1:p:87-98
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    Cited by:

    1. Lincove, Jane Arnold, 2009. "Determinants of schooling for boys and girls in Nigeria under a policy of free primary education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 474-484, August.
    2. repec:bla:rdevec:v:21:y:2017:i:4:p:1158-1177 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Lincove, Jane Arnold, 2012. "The influence of price on school enrollment under Uganda's policy of free primary education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 799-811.
    4. Lincove, Jane Arnold, 2015. "Improving Identification of Demand-Side Obstacles to Schooling: Findings from Revealed and Stated Preference Models in Two SSA Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 69-83.

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