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Lucky Last? Intra-Sibling Allocation of Child Labor

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  • Chesnokova Tatyana

    () (University of Auckland)

  • Vaithianathan Rhema

    () (University of Auckland)

Abstract

This paper has two objectives. First, we construct a theoretical model which explains the empirical evidence that in developing countries, first-born children are more likely to be child laborers than later-born. Second, we explore the long-run consequences of child labor regulations within our framework. In our model, credit-constrained parents use the labor income from their first-born child to fund the schooling of later-born children. In the presence of such intra-sibling effects, child labor laws which decrease work opportunities for children may backfire, increasing child labor and reducing human capital in the long run.

Suggested Citation

  • Chesnokova Tatyana & Vaithianathan Rhema, 2008. "Lucky Last? Intra-Sibling Allocation of Child Labor," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 8(1), pages 1-30, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejeap:v:8:y:2008:i:1:n:20
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ellen Webbink & Jeroen Smits & Eelke Jong, 2013. "Household and Context Determinants of Child Labor in 221 Districts of 18 Developing Countries," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 110(2), pages 819-836, January.
    2. Madeeha Gohar Qureshi & Saman Nazir & Hafsa Hina, 2014. "Child Work and Schooling in Pakistan— To What Extent Poverty and Other Demographic and Parental Background Matter?," PIDE-Working Papers 2014:105, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics.
    3. Lindskog, Annika, 2013. "The effect of siblings’ education on school-entry in the Ethiopian highlands," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 45-68.
    4. Ding, Weili & Zhang, Yuan, 2014. "When a son is born: The impact of fertility patterns on family finance in rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 192-208.
    5. Webbink, Ellen & Smits, Jeroen & de Jong, Eelke, 2012. "Hidden Child Labor: Determinants of Housework and Family Business Work of Children in 16 Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 631-642.
    6. Lindskog, Annika, 2011. "The Effect of Older Siblings’ Literacy on School Entry and Primary School Progress in the Ethiopian Highlands," Working Papers in Economics 495, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    7. Martina Kirchberger, 2014. "Preferences over Leisure and Consumption of Siblings and Intra-Household Allocation," Economics Series Working Papers 713, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

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