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Mothers’ Employment and their Children’s Schooling: a Joint Multilevel Analysis for India

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This paper studies the relation between mothers’ employment and their children’s schooling in India, where a high number of children are not attending school at compulsory school age. Using the second National Family Health Survey, the results of a joint multi-level random effects model show that, controlling for covariates, the correlation between mothers’ employment and children’s schooling is negative. A sensitivity analysis on wealth and education deciles shows that this relation disappears in urban areas and becomes weaker in rural areas only at the top wealth deciles, but persists for the more educated mothers. The last result may be driven by the low number of females with a high level of education in India, but it also seems to envisage that, for mothers with lower education, being literate does not increase pay conditions. These findings suggest that policies aiming at improving both women’s and children’s welfare should not only pursue higher levels of education, but also target improvements in women’s conditions in the labour market.

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  • F. Francavilla & Gianna Claudia Giannelli & Leonardo Grilli, 2010. "Mothers’ Employment and their Children’s Schooling: a Joint Multilevel Analysis for India," Working Papers - Economics wp2010_07.rdf, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze per l'Economia e l'Impresa.
  • Handle: RePEc:frz:wpaper:wp2010_07.rdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Cho, Sungju & Lee, Sanghyeon, 2016. "Multilevel Analysis On Mother’S Nutrition Label Use And Children’S Propensity For Being Overweight," Journal of Rural Development/Nongchon-Gyeongje, Korea Rural Economic Institute, vol. 39(December), December.
    2. Kpadonou, Rivaldo & Barbier, Bruno & Denton, Fatima & Owiyo, Tom, 2015. "Linkage between and determinants of organic fertilizer and modern varieties adoption in the Sahel," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212016, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. repec:eee:wdevel:v:100:y:2017:i:c:p:45-58 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Mauro, Vincenzo & Biggeri, Mario & Grilli, Leonardo, 2015. "Does Community-Based Rehabilitation Enhance the Multidimensional Well-Being of Deprived Persons With Disabilities? A Multilevel Impact Evaluation," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 190-202.
    5. Oryoie, Ali Reza & Alwang, Jeffrey & Tideman, Nicolaus, 2017. "Child Labor and Household Land Holding: Theory and Empirical Evidence from Zimbabwe," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 45-58.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    women’s employment; children’s schooling; household allocation of time; random effects; India; NFHS-2;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure

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