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The effect of overcrowded housing on children's performance at school

  • Goux, Dominique
  • Maurin, Eric

In France, almost one in five 15 year olds lives in a home with at least two children per bedroom. More than 60% of these adolescents have been held back in primary or middle school, a proportion that is more than 20 points higher than it is on average for adolescents of the same age. This Paper develops a semi-parametric analysis that suggests a relation of cause and effect between living in an overcrowded home and falling behind at school. According to our estimations, the disparity in living conditions is a very important channel through which parents’ lack of financial resources affects their children’s schooling.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0047-2727(04)00132-X
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Public Economics.

Volume (Year): 89 (2005)
Issue (Month): 5-6 (June)
Pages: 797-819

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Handle: RePEc:eee:pubeco:v:89:y:2005:i:5-6:p:797-819
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505578

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  1. Janet Currie & Aaron Yelowitz, 1997. "Are Public Housing Projects Good for Kids?," NBER Working Papers 6305, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Maurin, Eric, 2002. "The impact of parental income on early schooling transitions: A re-examination using data over three generations," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(3), pages 301-332, September.
  3. Arthur Lewbel, 1999. "Semiparametric Qualitative Response Model Estimation with Unknown Heteroskedasticity or Instrumental Variables," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 454, Boston College Department of Economics.
  4. Joshua D. Angrist & Alan B. Krueger, 1990. "The Effect of Age at School Entry on Educational Attainment: An Application of Instrumental Variables with Moments from Two Samples," NBER Working Papers 3571, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Thierry Magnac & Eric Maurin, 2007. "Identification and Information in Monotone Binary Models," Post-Print halshs-00754218, HAL.
  6. Angrist, Joshua D & Evans, William N, 1998. "Children and Their Parents' Labor Supply: Evidence from Exogenous Variation in Family Size," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 450-77, June.
  7. Richard Blundell & James Powell, 2001. "Endogeneity in nonparametric and semiparametric regression models," CeMMAP working papers CWP09/01, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  8. John Shea, 1997. "Does Parents' Money Matter?," NBER Working Papers 6026, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. David M. Blau, 1999. "The Effect Of Income On Child Development," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(2), pages 261-276, May.
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