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Origins of Gender Norms: Sibling Gender Composition and Women's Choice of Occupation and Partner

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  • Brenøe, Anne Ardila

    () (University of Zurich)

Abstract

I examine how one central aspect of the childhood family environment – sibling gender composition – affects women's gender conformity, measured through their choice of occupation and partner. Using Danish administrative data, I causally estimate the effect of having a second-born brother relative to a sister for first-born women. The results show that women with a brother acquire more traditional gender norms with negative consequences for their labor earnings. I provide evidence of increased gender-specialized parenting in families with mixed-sex children, suggesting a stronger transmission of traditional gender norms. Finally, I find indications of persistent effects to the next generation of girls.

Suggested Citation

  • Brenøe, Anne Ardila, 2018. "Origins of Gender Norms: Sibling Gender Composition and Women's Choice of Occupation and Partner," IZA Discussion Papers 11692, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11692
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    Cited by:

    1. Chise, Diana & Fort, Margherita & Monfardini, Chiara, 2019. "Scientifico! like Dad: On the Intergenerational Transmission of STEM Education in Italy," IZA Discussion Papers 12688, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender identity; sibling gender; occupational choice; family formation;

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs

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