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Gendering family composition: Sex preferences for children and childbearing behavior in the Nordic countries

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  • Gunnar Andersson
  • Karsten Hank
  • Marit Rønsen
  • Andres Vikat

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  • Gunnar Andersson & Karsten Hank & Marit Rønsen & Andres Vikat, 2006. "Gendering family composition: Sex preferences for children and childbearing behavior in the Nordic countries," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 43(2), pages 255-267, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:43:y:2006:i:2:p:255-267
    DOI: 10.1353/dem.2006.0010
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Karsten Hank & Hans-Peter Kohler, 2000. "Gender Preferences for Children in Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 2(1).
    2. Douglas Sloane & Che-Fu Lee, 1983. "Sex of Previous Children and Intentions for Further Births in the United States, 1965-1976," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 20(3), pages 353-367, August.
    3. Linda Haas, 2003. "Parental Leave and Gender Equality: Lessons from the European Union," Review of Policy Research, Policy Studies Organization, vol. 20(1), pages 89-114, March.
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