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The Effect of Opposite Sex Siblings on Cognitive and Noncognitive Skills in Early Childhood

Author

Listed:
  • Cyron, Laura

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

  • Schwerdt, Guido

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

  • Viarengo, Martina

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

Abstract

We investigate the effect of having opposite sex siblings on cognitive and noncognitive skills of children in the United States at the onset of formal education. Our identification strategy rests on the assumption that, conditional on covariates, the sibling sex composition of the two firstborn children in a family is arguably exogenous. With regard to cognitive skills, learning skills, and self-control measured in kindergarten, we find that boys benefit from having a sister, while there is no effect for girls. We also find evidence for the effect fading out as early as first grade.

Suggested Citation

  • Cyron, Laura & Schwerdt, Guido & Viarengo, Martina, 2016. "The Effect of Opposite Sex Siblings on Cognitive and Noncognitive Skills in Early Childhood," ADBI Working Papers 627, Asian Development Bank Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:adbiwp:0627
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Andrew J. Hill, 2015. "The Girl Next Door: The Effect of Opposite Gender Friends on High School Achievement," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 147-177, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Anne Ardila Brenøe, 2018. "Origins of gender norms: sibling gender composition and women's choice of occupation and partner," ECON - Working Papers 294, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    sibling gender effects; gender peer effects; education; cognitive skills; noncognitive skills; early childhood;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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