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Student exposure to socio-economic diversity and students’ university outcomes – Evidence from English administrative data

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  • Braakmann, Nils
  • McDonald, Stephen

Abstract

Many countries encourage universities to increase the ethnic and socio-economic diversity of their student bodies, for example, through affirmative action policies. We use unique administrative data for all undergraduate degree students entering English universities between 2008 and 2010 to investigate the role of a more diverse environment for students’ degree outcomes. We find a complex picture – a more diverse environment is beneficial for students, but so is meeting some students from the same background. These effects are different for good and top degrees, interact with each other and vary across institutions, subjects and student subgroups.

Suggested Citation

  • Braakmann, Nils & McDonald, Stephen, 2018. "Student exposure to socio-economic diversity and students’ university outcomes – Evidence from English administrative data," MPRA Paper 90351, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:90351
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    Cited by:

    1. Judith M. Delaney & Paul J. Devereux, 2021. "Gender and Educational Achievement: Stylized Facts and Causal Evidence," Working Papers 202103, School of Economics, University College Dublin.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Diversity; affirmative action; widening participation; university; student outcomes;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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