IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/crm/wpaper/1807.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Inter-ethnic relations of teenagers in England’s schools: the role of school and neighbourhood ethnic composition

Author

Listed:
  • Simon Burgess

    () (University of Bristol)

  • Lucinda Platt

    () (London School of Economics)

Abstract

The paper presents an empirical analysis of inter-ethnic relations among adolescents in England’s schools, the first national study of schools throughout England to relate inter-ethnic attitudes to both school and area ethnic composition. We combine survey data on ‘warmth’ of feeling for specific ethnic groups, friendships and attitudes with administrative data on the shares of those groups at school and area level. We confirm that the pupils have warmer feelings for their own ethnic group than for others. Second, we show that in schools with more pupils from another ethnic group the gap between a pupil’s views of those from her own group and from another ethnic group is smaller. This is true for attitudes of the majority and of minority ethnic groups. Third, we show that school composition (interpreted as contact) mitigates area composition (interpreted as exposure).

Suggested Citation

  • Simon Burgess & Lucinda Platt, 2018. "Inter-ethnic relations of teenagers in England’s schools: the role of school and neighbourhood ethnic composition," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1807, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  • Handle: RePEc:crm:wpaper:1807
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.cream-migration.org/publ_uploads/CDP_07_18.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alberto Alesina & Eliana La Ferrara, 2000. "Participation in Heterogeneous Communities," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(3), pages 847-904.
    2. Harminder Battu & McDonald Mwale & Yves Zenou, 2007. "Oppositional identities and the labor market," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 20(3), pages 643-667, July.
    3. Natalia Letki, 2008. "Does Diversity Erode Social Cohesion? Social Capital and Race in British Neighbourhoods," Political Studies, Political Studies Association, vol. 56, pages 99-126, March.
    4. Hangartner, Dominik & Dinas, Elias & Marbach, Moritz & Matakos, Konstantinos & Xefteris, Dimitrios, 2019. "Does Exposure to the Refugee Crisis Make Natives More Hostile?," American Political Science Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 113(2), pages 442-455, May.
    5. Bowyer, Benjamin T., 2009. "The Contextual Determinants of Whites’ Racial Attitudes in England," British Journal of Political Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 39(3), pages 559-586, July.
    6. Sturgis, Patrick & Brunton-Smith, Ian & Read, Sanna & Allum, Nick, 2011. "Does Ethnic Diversity Erode Trust? Putnam’s ‘Hunkering Down’ Thesis Reconsidered," British Journal of Political Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 41(1), pages 57-82, January.
    7. David Schindler & Mark Westcott, 2017. "Shocking Racial Attitudes: Black G.I.s in Europe," CESifo Working Paper Series 6723, CESifo.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:crm:wpaper:1807. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (CReAM Administrator) or (Thomas Cornelissen). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/cmucluk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.