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Getting Used to Diversity? Immigration and Trust in Sweden

Author

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  • Karl McShane

    () (Department of Economics, Lund University)

Abstract

This paper studies what effect past regional experiences of immigration has on how people react to recent immigration in terms of social trust. The effect of present-day diversity on trust is compared across two groups of regions in Sweden: one group with low levels of past immigration and one group with high levels of past immigration. The results clearly show that people in regions with high levels of past immigration decrease their trust as a reaction to present-day diversity while people in the other regions do not.

Suggested Citation

  • Karl McShane, 2017. "Getting Used to Diversity? Immigration and Trust in Sweden," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 37(3), pages 1895-1910.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-17-00486
    as

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    File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2017/Volume37/EB-17-V37-I3-P171.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social Trust; Immigration; Diversity; Historical context;

    JEL classification:

    • Z1 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics

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