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Shocking Racial Attitudes: Black G.I.s in Europe

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  • David Schindler
  • Mark Westcott

Abstract

Can attitudes towards minorities, an important cultural trait, be changed? We show that the presence of African American soldiers in the U.K. during World War II reduced anti-minority prejudice, a result of the positive interactions which took place between soldiers and the local population. The change has been persistent: in locations in which more African American soldiers were posted there are fewer members of and voters for the U.K.’s leading far-right party, less implicit bias against blacks and fewer individuals professing racial prejudice, all measured around 2010. Our results point towards intergenerational transmission from parents to children as the most likely explanation.

Suggested Citation

  • David Schindler & Mark Westcott, 2017. "Shocking Racial Attitudes: Black G.I.s in Europe," CESifo Working Paper Series 6723, CESifo.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_6723
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    File URL: https://www.cesifo.org/DocDL/cesifo1_wp6723_0.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sara Lowes & Nathan Nunn & James A. Robinson & Jonathan Weigel, 2015. "Understanding Ethnic Identity in Africa: Evidence from the Implicit Association Test (IAT)," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(5), pages 340-345, May.
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    4. Alexandra Avdeenko & Thomas Siedler, 2017. "Intergenerational Correlations of Extreme Right‐Wing Party Preferences and Attitudes toward Immigration," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 119(3), pages 768-800, July.
    5. Nico Voigtländer & Hans-Joachim Voth, 2012. "Persecution Perpetuated: The Medieval Origins of Anti-Semitic Violence in Nazi Germany," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 127(3), pages 1339-1392.
    6. Christian Ochsner & Felix Roesel, 2020. "Migrating Extremists," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 130(628), pages 1135-1172.
    7. Bisin, Alberto & Verdier, Thierry, 2001. "The Economics of Cultural Transmission and the Dynamics of Preferences," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 97(2), pages 298-319, April.
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    10. repec:hrv:faseco:33077827 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Edo, Anthony & Giesing, Yvonne & Öztunc, Jonathan & Poutvaara, Panu, 2019. "Immigration and electoral support for the far-left and the far-right," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 115(C), pages 99-143.
    2. Simon Burgess & Lucinda Platt, 2018. "Inter-ethnic relations of teenagers in England’s schools: the role of school and neighbourhood ethnic composition," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1807, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    3. Simon Burgess & Lucinda Platt, 2018. "Inter-ethnic Relations of Teenagers in England’s Schools: the Role of School and Neighbourhood Ethnic Composition," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 18/699, School of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J17 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Value of Life; Foregone Income
    • N00 - Economic History - - General - - - General
    • Z10 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - General

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