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Discrimination as a Self-Fulfilling Prophecy: Evidence from French Grocery Stores

Author

Listed:
  • Dylan Glover

    (Sciences Po Paris)

  • Amanda Pallais

    () (Harvard University and NBER)

  • William Parienté

    () (UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES))

Abstract

Examining the performance of cashiers in a French grocery store chain, we find that manager bias negatively affects minority job performance. In the stores studied, cashiers work with different managers on different days and their schedules are determined quasi-randomly. When minority cashiers, but not majority cashiers, are scheduled to work with managers who are biased (as determined by an Implicit Association Test), they are absent more often, spend less time at work, scan items more slowly, and take more time between customers. Manager bias has consequences for the average performance of minority workers: while on average minority and majority workers perform equivalently, on days where managers are unbiased, minorities perform significantly better than do majority workers. This appears to be because biased managers interact less with minorities, leading minorities to exert less effort.

Suggested Citation

  • Dylan Glover & Amanda Pallais & William Parienté, 2016. "Discrimination as a Self-Fulfilling Prophecy: Evidence from French Grocery Stores," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2016025, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
  • Handle: RePEc:ctl:louvir:2016025
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    File URL: http://sites.uclouvain.be/econ/DP/IRES/2016025.pdf
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