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Does Implicit Bias Predict Dictator Giving?

Author

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  • Daniel J. Lee

    () (Jones Graduate School of Business, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, Houston, TX 77005-1827, USA)

Abstract

Implicit associations and biases are carried without awareness or conscious direction, yet there is reason to believe they may be influenced by social pressures. In this paper, I study social pressure as a motive to give, as well as giving itself under conditions of implicit bias. In doing so, I pair the Implicit Association Test (IAT), commonplace in other social sciences, with a laboratory dictator game with sorting. I find that despite its popularity, the IAT does not predict dictator giving and social pressure does not explain acts of giving from biased dictators. These results are indicative of the meaningful difference between having an implicit bias and acting on one. As such, results can be thought of as a bound on the external validity of the IAT.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel J. Lee, 2018. "Does Implicit Bias Predict Dictator Giving?," Games, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(4), pages 1-19, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jgames:v:9:y:2018:i:4:p:73-:d:171360
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    IAT; implicit bias; race; prosocial behavior; social pressures;

    JEL classification:

    • C - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods
    • C7 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory
    • C70 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - General
    • C71 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Cooperative Games
    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • C73 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Stochastic and Dynamic Games; Evolutionary Games

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