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Demand for Safe Spaces : Avoiding Harassment and Stigma

Author

Listed:
  • Kondylis,Florence
  • Legovini,Arianna
  • Vyborny,Kate
  • Zwager,Astrid Maria Theresia
  • Cardoso De Andrade,Luiza

Abstract

What are the costs to women of harassment on public transit? This study randomizes the price of a women-reserved"safe space"in Rio de Janeiro and crowdsource information on 22,000 rides. Women in the public space experience harassment once a week. A fifth of riders are willing to forgo 20 percent of the fare to ride in the"safe space". Randomly assigning riders to the"safe space"reduces physical harassment by 50 percent, implying a cost of $1.45 per incident. Implicit Association Tests show that women face a stigma for riding in the public space that may outweigh the benefits of the safe space.

Suggested Citation

  • Kondylis,Florence & Legovini,Arianna & Vyborny,Kate & Zwager,Astrid Maria Theresia & Cardoso De Andrade,Luiza, 2020. "Demand for Safe Spaces : Avoiding Harassment and Stigma," Policy Research Working Paper Series 9269, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:9269
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    File URL: http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/890601591188701117/pdf/Demand-for-Safe-Spaces-Avoiding-Harassment-and-Stigma.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Livio Raccuia, 2016. "Single-Target Implicit Association Tests (ST-IAT) Predict Voting Behavior of Decided and Undecided Voters in Swiss Referendums," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 11(10), pages 1-19, October.
    9. repec:hrv:faseco:33077827 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Transport in Urban Areas; Urban Transport; Gender and Development; Crime and Society; Transport Services; Labor Markets;

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