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Reducing discrimination in the field: Evidence from an awareness raising intervention targeting gender biases in student evaluations of teaching

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  • Boring, Anne
  • Philippe, Arnaud

Abstract

This paper presents the results of a field experiment designed to reduce gender discrimination in student evaluations of teaching (SET). In the first intervention, students receive a normative statement reminding them that they should not discriminate in SETs. In the second intervention, the normative statement includes precise information about how other students (especially male students) have discriminated against female teachers in previous years. The purely normative statement has no significant impact on SET overall satisfaction scores, suggesting that a blanket awareness-raising campaign may be inefficient to reduce discrimination. However, the informational statement appears to significantly reduce gender discrimination. The effect we find mainly comes from a change in male students’ evaluation of female teachers.

Suggested Citation

  • Boring, Anne & Philippe, Arnaud, 2021. "Reducing discrimination in the field: Evidence from an awareness raising intervention targeting gender biases in student evaluations of teaching," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 193(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:pubeco:v:193:y:2021:i:c:s0047272720301870
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jpubeco.2020.104323
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    2. Ayllón, Sara, 2021. "Online Teaching and Gender Bias," IZA Discussion Papers 14787, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Student evaluations of teaching; Gender biases; Field experiment;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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