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Revealing Stereotypes: Evidence from Immigrants in Schools

Author

Listed:
  • Alesina, Alberto F
  • Carlana, Michela
  • La Ferrara, Eliana
  • Pinotti, Paolo

Abstract

If individuals become aware of their stereotypes, do they change their behavior? We study this question in the context of teachers' bias in grading immigrants and native children in middle schools. Teachers give lower grades to immigrant students compared to natives who have the same performance on standardized, blindly-graded tests. We then relate differences in grading to teachers' stereotypes, elicited through an Implicit Association Test (IAT). We find that math teachers with stronger stereotypes give lower grades to immigrants compared to natives with the same performance. Literature teachers do not differentially grade immigrants based on their own stereotypes. Finally, we share teachers' own IAT score with them, randomizing the timing of disclosure around the date on which they assign term grades. All teachers informed of their stereotypes before term grading increase grades assigned to immigrants. Revealing stereotypes may be a powerful intervention to decrease discrimination, but it may also induce a reaction from individuals who were not acting in a biased way.

Suggested Citation

  • Alesina, Alberto F & Carlana, Michela & La Ferrara, Eliana & Pinotti, Paolo, 2019. "Revealing Stereotypes: Evidence from Immigrants in Schools," CEPR Discussion Papers 13555, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:13555
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Michela Carlana & Eliana La Ferrara & Paolo Pinotti, 2017. "Goals and Gaps: Educational Careers of Immigrant Children," Working Papers 111, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    2. Lucia Corno & Eliana La Ferrara & Justine Burns, 2019. "Interaction, stereotypes and performance. Evidence from South Africa," IFS Working Papers W19/03, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    3. Facchini, Giovanni & Margalit, Yotam & Nakata, Hiroyuki, 2016. "Countering Public Opposition to Immigration: The Impact of Information Campaigns," IZA Discussion Papers 10420, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Michela Carlana, 2019. "Implicit Stereotypes: Evidence from Teachers’ Gender Bias," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 134(3), pages 1163-1224.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Revealing Stereotypes: Evidence from Immigrants in Schools
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2019-04-29 14:04:37
    2. Revealing Stereotypes: Evidence from Immigrants in Schools
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2019-01-21 17:11:12

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ingar K. Haaland & Christopher Roth & Johannes Wohlfart, 2020. "Designing Information Provision Experiments," CESifo Working Paper Series 8406, CESifo.
    2. Mongoljin Batsaikhan & Mette Gørtz & John Kennes & Ran Sun Lyng & Daniel Monte & Norovsambuu Tumennasan, 2019. "Daycare Choice and Ethnic Diversity: Evidence from a Randomized Survey," Economics Working Papers 2019-02, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    3. Luca Corazzini & Elena Meschi & Caterina Pavese, 2019. "Impact of Early Childcare on Immigrant Children’s Educational Performance," Working Papers 2019: 24, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
    4. Ferman, Bruno & Fontes, Luiz Felipe, 2020. "Discriminating Behavior: Evidence from teachers’ grading bias," MPRA Paper 100400, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Haaland, Ingar & Roth, Christopher & Wohlfart. Johannes, 2020. "Designing Information Provision Experiments," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 1275, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    6. Armin Falk & Fabian Kosse & Pia Pinger, 2020. "Mentoring and Schooling Decisions: Causal Evidence," CESifo Working Paper Series 8382, CESifo.
    7. Rangel, Marcos A. & Shi, Ying, 2020. "First Impressions: The Case of Teacher Racial Bias," IZA Discussion Papers 13347, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Brock, Michelle & de Haas, Ralph, 2020. "Discriminatory Lending: Evidence from Bankers in the Lab," CEPR Discussion Papers 14340, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Haaland, Ingar & Roth, Christopher, 2019. "Beliefs About Racial Discrimination and Support for Pro-Black Policies," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 2/2019, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Economics.
    10. Nikoloz Kudashvili & Philipp Lergetporer, 2019. "Do Minorities Misrepresent Their Ethnicity to Avoid Discrimination?," CESifo Working Paper Series 7861, CESifo.
    11. Armin Falk & Fabian Kosse & Pia Pinger, 2020. "Mentoring and Schooling Decisions: Causal Evidence," ECONtribute Discussion Papers Series 008, University of Bonn and University of Cologne, Germany.
    12. Nikoloz Kudashvili & Philipp Lergetporer, 2019. "Do Minorities Misrepresent Their Ethnicity to Avoid Discrimination?," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp644, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    13. Falk, Armin & Kosse, Fabian & Pinger, Pia, 2020. "Mentoring and Schooling Decisions: Causal Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 13387, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    bias in grading; IAT; immigrants; implicit stereotypes; teachers;

    JEL classification:

    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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