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Intergenerational Correlations of Extreme Right-Wing Party Preferences and Attitudes toward Immigration

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  • Alexandra Avdeenko
  • Thomas Siedler

Abstract

This study analyzes the importance of parental socialization on the development of children’s far right-wing preferences and attitudes towards immigration. Using longitudinal data from Germany, our intergenerational estimates suggest that the strongest and most important predictor for young people’s right-wing extremism are parents’ right-wing extremist attitudes. While intergenerational associations in attitudes towards immigration are equally high for sons and daughters, we find a positive intergenerational transmission of right-wing extremist party affinity for sons, but not for daughters. Compared to the intergenerational correlation of other party affinities, the high association between fathers’ and sons’ right-wing extremist attitudes is particularly striking.

Suggested Citation

  • Alexandra Avdeenko & Thomas Siedler, 2016. "Intergenerational Correlations of Extreme Right-Wing Party Preferences and Attitudes toward Immigration," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 845, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwsop:diw_sp845
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ochsner, Christian & Roesel, Felix, 2016. "Migrating Extremists," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145632, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    2. Panu Poutvaara & Max Steinhardt, 2015. "Bitterness in Life and Attitudes Towards Immigration," CESifo Working Paper Series 5611, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Fontana, Nicola & Nannicini, Tommaso & Tabellini, Guido, 2017. "Historical Roots of Political Extremism: The Effects of Nazi Occupation of Italy," CEPR Discussion Papers 11758, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. David Schindler & Mark Westcott, 2017. "Shocking Racial Attitudes: Black G.I.s in Europe," CESifo Working Paper Series 6723, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Alessandro Sola, 2018. "The 2015 Refugee Crisis in Germany: Concerns about Immigration and Populism," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 966, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    political preferences; extremism; gender differences; longitudinal data; intergenerational links;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • P16 - Economic Systems - - Capitalist Systems - - - Political Economy of Capitalism

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