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Parental unemployment and young people's extreme right‐wing party affinity: evidence from panel data

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  • Thomas Siedler

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  • Thomas Siedler, 2011. "Parental unemployment and young people's extreme right‐wing party affinity: evidence from panel data," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 174(3), pages 737-758, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jorssa:v:174:y:2011:i:3:p:737-758
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. John Micklewright & Sylke V. Schnepf, 2010. "How reliable are income data collected with a single question?," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 173(2), pages 409-429.
    2. Nicholas Barr & Peter Diamond, 2006. "The Economics of Pensions," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(1), pages 15-39, Spring.
    3. Mathiowetz, Nancy A & Duncan, Greg J, 1988. "Out of Work, Out of Mind: Response Errors in Retrospective Reports of Unemployment," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 6(2), pages 221-229, April.
    4. Richard Blundell & Mike Brewer & Marco Francesconi, 2008. "Job Changes and Hours Changes: Understanding the Path of Labor Supply Adjustment," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26(3), pages 421-453, July.
    5. John Ermisch & Marco Francesconi, 2000. "Educational Choice, Families, and Young People's Earnings," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 35(1), pages 143-176.
    6. Marco Francesconi, 2005. "An evaluation of the childhood family structure measures from the sixth wave of the British Household Panel Survey," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 168(3), pages 539-566.
    7. Lorenzo Cappellari & Stephen P. Jenkins, 2008. "Estimating low pay transition probabilities accounting for endogenous selection mechanisms," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series C, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 57(2), pages 165-186.
    8. James Banks & Sarah Smith, 2006. "Retirement in the UK," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(1), pages 40-56, Spring.
    9. Dayal N & Gomulka J & Mitton L & Sutherland H, 2000. "Enhancing Family Resources Survey income data with expenditure data from the Family Expenditure Survey: data comparisons," Microsimulation Unit Research Notes MU/RN/40, Microsimulation Unit at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    10. Koenker,Roger, 2005. "Quantile Regression," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521845731, December.
    11. Lumsdaine, Robin L. & Mitchell, Olivia S., 1999. "New developments in the economic analysis of retirement," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 49, pages 3261-3307 Elsevier.
    12. Sutherland, Holly & Piachaud, David, 2001. "Reducing Child Poverty in Britain: An Assessment of Government Policy 1997-2001," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(469), pages 85-101, February.
    13. Giorgina Brown & John Micklewright & Sylke V. Schnepf & Robert Waldmann, 2007. "International surveys of educational achievement: how robust are the findings?," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 170(3), pages 623-646.
    14. Mark B. Stewart, 2004. "The Impact of the Introduction of the U.K. Minimum Wage on the Employment Probabilities of Low-Wage Workers," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 2(1), pages 67-97, March.
    15. Disney, Richard & Whitehouse, Edward, 1996. "What Are Occupational Pension Plan Entitlements Worth in Britain?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 63(250), pages 213-238, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Marcus, Jan, 2013. "The Effect of Unemployment on the Mental Health of Spouses – Evidence from plant closures in Germany," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 546-558.
    2. Doreen Triebe, 2015. "The Added Worker Effect Differentiated by Gender and Partnership Status: Evidence from Involuntary Job Loss," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 740, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    3. Arnaud Chevalier & Orla Doyle, 2012. "SCHOOLING AND VOTER TURNOUT: Is there an American Exception?," Working Papers 201210, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    4. Timo Hener & Helmut Rainer & Thomas Siedler, 2016. "Political socialization in flux?: linking family non-intactness during childhood to adult civic engagement," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 179(3), pages 633-656, June.
    5. Jan Marcus;, 2012. "The effect of unemployment on the mental health of spouses - Evidence from plant closures in Germany," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 12/17, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    6. Mocan, Naci & Raschke, Christian, 2014. "Economic Well-being and Anti-Semitic, Xenophobic, and Racist Attitudes in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 8126, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Naci Mocan & Christian Raschke, 2016. "Economic well-being and anti-Semitic, xenophobic, and racist attitudes in Germany," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 41(1), pages 1-63, February.
    8. Alexandra Avdeenko & Thomas Siedler, 2017. "Intergenerational Correlations of Extreme Right-Wing Party Preferences and Attitudes toward Immigration," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 119(3), pages 768-800, July.
    9. Schneider, Lutz & Hyll, Walter, 2016. "Social Comparisons and Attitudes towards Foreigners - Evidence from the ‘Fall of the Iron Curtain’," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145605, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    10. Hyll, Walter & Schneider, Lutz, 2017. "Income Comparisons and Attitudes towards Foreigners," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168069, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

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