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Right-Wing Extremism and the Well-Being of Immigrants

  • Andreas Knabe
  • Steffen Rätzel
  • Stephan L. Thomsen

This study analyzes the effects of right-wing extremism on the well-being of immigrants based on data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) for the years 1984 to 2006 merged with state-level information on election outcomes. The results show that the life satisfaction of immigrants is significantly reduced if right-wing extremism in the native population increases. Moreover ; the life satisfaction of highly educated immigrants is affected more strongly than that of low-skilled immigrants. This supports the view that policies aimed at making immigration more attractive to the high-skilled have to include measures that reduce xenophobic attitudes in the native population.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/kykl.12037
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Article provided by Wiley Blackwell in its journal Kyklos.

Volume (Year): 66 (2013)
Issue (Month): 4 (November)
Pages: 567-590

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Handle: RePEc:bla:kyklos:v:66:y:2013:i:4:p:567-590
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