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A model of cultural transmission, voting and political ideology

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  • Bisin, Alberto
  • Verdier, Thierry

Abstract

In this paper we present a model of cultural transmission of preferences on goods some of which are provided publicly through simple majority voting. We emphasize the existence of a two way causality between socialization decisions and political outcomes. This generales the possibility of indeterminacies and multiple self fulfilling equilibrium paths in cultural change and politics. We provide then a rationale for ideologies and collective socialization institutions as coordination mechanisms allowing cultural groups to preserve or shift political power in favor of their preference profile in the long run.
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  • Bisin, Alberto & Verdier, Thierry, 2000. "A model of cultural transmission, voting and political ideology," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 5-29, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:poleco:v:16:y:2000:i:1:p:5-29
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    1. Kalt, Joseph P & Zupan, Mark A, 1984. "Capture and Ideology in the Economic Theory of Politics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 74(3), pages 279-300, June.
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    6. Mullins, Willard A., 1972. "On the Concept of Ideology in Political Science," American Political Science Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 66(2), pages 498-510, June.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Z00 - Other Special Topics - - General - - - General
    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General

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