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The Effects of Reducing Tracking in Upper Secondary School: Evidence from a Large-Scale Pilot Scheme

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  • Caroline Hall

Abstract

By exploiting an extensive pilot scheme that preceded an educational reform, this paper evaluates the effects of introducing a more comprehensive upper secondary school system in Sweden. The reform reduced the differences between academic and vocational tracks through prolonging and increasing the academic content of the latter. As a result, all vocational students became eligible for university studies. The results suggest that the policy change increased the amount of upper secondary schooling obtained among vocational students, but did not affect enrollment in university studies or students’ earnings later in life.

Suggested Citation

  • Caroline Hall, 2012. "The Effects of Reducing Tracking in Upper Secondary School: Evidence from a Large-Scale Pilot Scheme," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 47(1), pages 237-269.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:46:y:2012:i:1:p:237-269
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