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The Effects of Early Tracking on Student Performance: Evidence from a School Reform in Bavaria

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  • Marc Piopiunik

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Abstract

This paper evaluates a school reform in Bavaria that moved the timing of tracking in low- and middle-track schools from grade 6 to grade 4; students in high-track schools were not affected. To eliminate state specific and school-type-specific shocks, I estimate a triple-differences model using three PISA waves. The results indicate that the reform reduced the performance of 15-year-old students both in low- and middle-track schools. Further evidence suggests that the share of very low-performing students increased in low-track schools.

Suggested Citation

  • Marc Piopiunik, 2013. "The Effects of Early Tracking on Student Performance: Evidence from a School Reform in Bavaria," ifo Working Paper Series 153, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ifowps:_153
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    Cited by:

    1. Marc Piopiunik, 2013. "Die Einführung der sechsstufigen Realschule in Bayern: Evaluierung der Auswirkungen auf die Schülerleistungen," ifo Schnelldienst, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 66(03), pages 22-28, February.
    2. Ludger Woessmann, 2016. "The Importance of School Systems: Evidence from International Differences in Student Achievement," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 30(3), pages 3-32, Summer.
    3. Fitzenberger, Bernd & Licklederer, Stefanie, 2016. "Additional Career Assistance and Educational Outcomes for Students in Lower Track Secondary Schools," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145787, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    4. Klara Gurzo, 2014. "The long term effects of early selection – a quasi natural policy experiment from Hungary," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 9,in: Adela García Aracil & Isabel Neira Gómez (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 9, edition 1, volume 9, chapter 21, pages 407-427 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
    5. Annabelle Krause & Simone Schüller, 2014. "Evidence and Persistence of Education Inequality in an Early-Tracking System - The German Case," FBK-IRVAPP Working Papers 2014-07, Research Institute for the Evaluation of Public Policies (IRVAPP), Bruno Kessler Foundation.
    6. Simon Lange & Marten von Werder, 2016. "Tracking and the Intergenerational Transmission of Education: Evidence from a Natural Experiment," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 880, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    7. Potrafke, Niklas, 2013. "Globalization and labor market institutions: International empirical evidence," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 829-842.
    8. Simon Lange & Marten von Werder, 2014. "The Effects of Delayed Tracking: Evidence from German States," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 163, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    9. Cockx, Bart, 2013. "Youth Unemployment in Belgium: Diagnosis and Key Remedies," IZA Policy Papers 66, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Cordero, José Manuel & Cristobal, Victor & Santín, Daniel, 2017. "Causal Inference on Education Policies: A Survey of Empirical Studies Using PISA, TIMSS and PIRLS," MPRA Paper 76295, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. repec:spr:jopoec:v:30:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s00148-017-0643-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Roller, Marcus & Steinberg, Daniel, 2017. "The Distributional Effects of Early School Stratification - Non-Parametric Evidence from Germany," Working papers 2017/20, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel.
    13. Horn, Dániel & Gurzó, Klára, 2015. "A korai iskolai szelekció hosszú távú hatása. Egy közpolitikai kísérlet tanulságai
      [The long-term effects of early educational selection. A quasi-natural policy experiment from Hungary]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(10), pages 1070-1096.
    14. Marcus Roller, Daniel Steinberg, 2017. "The Distributional Effects of Early School Stratification – Non-Parametric Evidence from Germany," Diskussionsschriften credresearchpaper19, Universitaet Bern, Departement Volkswirtschaft - CRED.
    15. repec:eee:ecoedu:v:61:y:2017:i:c:p:59-78 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Tracking; student performance; PISA;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality

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