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The Impact of Parental Death on Child Well-being: Evidence from the Indian Ocean Tsunami

Author

Listed:
  • Ava Cas
  • Elizabeth Frankenberg
  • Wayan Suriastini
  • Duncan Thomas

Abstract

Identifying the impact of parental death on the well-being of children is complicated because parental death is likely to be correlated with other, unobserved, factors that affect child well-being. Population-representative longitudinal data collected in Aceh, Indonesia, before and after the December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami are used to identify the impact of parental deaths on the well-being of children who were age 9 through 17 years old at the time of the tsunami. Exploiting the unanticipated nature of parental death due to the tsunami in combination with measuring well-being of the same children before and after the tsunami, models that include child fixed effects are estimated to isolate the causal effect of parental death. Comparisons are drawn between those children who lost one parent, both parents and those whose parents survived. Shorter-term impacts on school attendance and time allocation a year after the tsunami are examined as well as longer-term impacts on education trajectories and marriage. Shorter- and longer-term impacts are not the same. Five years after the tsunami, there are substantial deleterious impacts of the tsunami on older boys and girls whereas the effects on younger children are more muted.

Suggested Citation

  • Ava Cas & Elizabeth Frankenberg & Wayan Suriastini & Duncan Thomas, 2013. "The Impact of Parental Death on Child Well-being: Evidence from the Indian Ocean Tsunami," NBER Working Papers 19357, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:19357
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kathleen Beegle & Sofya Krutikova, 2008. "Adult mortality and children’s transition into marriage," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(42), pages 1551-1574, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Huong Thu Le & Ha Trong Nguyen, 2015. "Parental health and children’s cognitive and non-cognitive development: New evidence from the Longitudinal Survey of Australian Children," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1506, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    2. Deuchert, Eva & Felfe, Christina, 2015. "The tempest: Short- and long-term consequences of a natural disaster for children׳s development," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 280-294.
    3. repec:nbr:nberch:13829 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Elizabeth Frankenberg & Duncan Thomas, 2017. "Human Capital and Shocks: Evidence on Education, Health, and Nutrition," Working Papers 2017-035, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    5. Elizabeth Frankenberg & Duncan Thomas, 2017. "Human Capital and Shocks: Evidence on Education, Health, and Nutrition," NBER Chapters,in: The Economics of Poverty Traps National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Ava Gail Cas, 2016. "Typhoon Aid and Development: The Effects of Typhoon-Resistant Schools and Instructional Resources on Educational Attainment in the Philippines," Asian Development Review, MIT Press, vol. 33(1), pages 183-201, March.
    7. Dhanaraj, Sowmya, 2016. "Effects of parental health shocks on children’s schooling: Evidence from Andhra Pradesh, India," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 115-125.
    8. Le, Huong & Nguyen, Ha, 2015. "Parental health and children’s cognitive and non-cognitive development: New evidence from the Longitudinal Survey of Australian Children," MPRA Paper 67590, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Woode, Maame Esi, 2017. "Parental health shocks and schooling: The impact of mutual health insurance in Rwanda," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 173(C), pages 35-47.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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