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Parental Loss and Children’s Well-Being

Author

Listed:
  • Lea Gimenez
  • Shin-Yi Chou
  • Jin-Tan Liu
  • Jin-Long Liu

Abstract

This paper identifies the effects of parental death on children’s well-being using six administrative data sets from Taiwan. Information collected at different points in children’s lives and detailed parental mortality records are used to show that parental death has significant long-term implications for human capital accumulation: the quality of education of high income children is significantly reduced; the impact of a father’s death on his son’s probability of acquiring higher education increases with income; children are more likely to substitute an income earning occupation in place of higher education; low-income girls are also more likely to marry during their teenage years.

Suggested Citation

  • Lea Gimenez & Shin-Yi Chou & Jin-Tan Liu & Jin-Long Liu, 2013. "Parental Loss and Children’s Well-Being," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 48(4), pages 1035-1071.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:48:y:2013:iv:1:p:1035-1071
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Martha Ainsworth & Kathleen Beegle & Godlike Koda, 2005. "The Impact of Adult Mortality and Parental Deaths on Primary Schooling in North-Western Tanzania," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(3), pages 412-439.
    2. Shin-Yi Chou & Jin-Tan Liu & Michael Grossman & Ted Joyce, 2010. "Parental Education and Child Health: Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Taiwan," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(1), pages 33-61, January.
    3. Anne Case & Christina Paxson & Joseph Ableidinger, 2004. "Orphans in Africa: parental death, poverty, and school enrollment," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 41(3), pages 483-508, August.
    4. Philip K. Robins & David H. Greenberg & Paul Fronstin, 2001. "Parental disruption and the labour market performance of children when they reach adulthood," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 14(1), pages 137-172.
    5. Corak, Miles, 2001. "Death and Divorce: The Long-Term Consequences of Parental Loss on Adolescents," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(3), pages 682-715, July.
    6. David Evans & Edward Miguel, 2007. "Orphans and schooling in africa: a longitudinal analysis," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 44(1), pages 35-57, February.
    7. Janet Currie & Enrico Moretti, 2003. "Mother's Education and the Intergenerational Transmission of Human Capital: Evidence from College Openings," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(4), pages 1495-1532.
    8. Ming-Jen Lin & Jin-Tan Liu & Shin-Yi Chou, 2007. "As low birth weight babies grow, can well-educated parents buffer this adverse factor? A research note," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 44(2), pages 335-343, May.
    9. repec:pri:cheawb:case_paxson_orphansafrica is not listed on IDEAS
    10. repec:pri:rpdevs:case_paxson_orphansafrica.pdf is not listed on IDEAS
    11. World Bank, 2002. "Education and HIV / AIDS : A Window of Hope," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14073.
    12. Jane Fortson, 2008. "The gradient in sub-saharan Africa: Socioeconomic status and HIV/AIDS," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 45(2), pages 303-322, May.
    13. Anne Case & Cally Ardington, 2006. "The impact of parental death on school outcomes: Longitudinal evidence from South Africa," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 43(3), pages 401-420, August.
    14. repec:pri:rpdevs:case_paxson_orphansafrica is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Ming-Jen Lin & Jin-Tan Liu & Shin-Yi Chou, 2007. "As Low Birth Weight Babies Grow, Can 'Good' Parents Buffer this Adverse Factor? A Research Note," NBER Working Papers 12857, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Kevin Lang & Jay L. Zagorsky, 2001. "Does Growing up with a Parent Absent Really Hurt?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 36(2), pages 253-273.
    17. Espinosa, Javier & Evans, William N., 2008. "Heightened mortality after the death of a spouse: Marriage protection or marriage selection?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1326-1342, September.
    18. Stacey H. Chen & Yen-Chien Chen & Jin-Tan Liu, 2009. "The Impact of Unexpected Maternal Death on Education: First Evidence from Three National Administrative Data Links," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 149-153, May.
    19. repec:pri:cheawb:case_paxson_orphansafrica.pdf is not listed on IDEAS
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