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Orphans at risk in Sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence on educational and health outcomes

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  • Coneus, Katja
  • Mühlenweg, Andrea M.

Abstract

In this paper, we examine how orphanhood affects children's educational and health outcomes in eleven sub-Saharan African countries. Our analysis is based on a comparison of orphans and non-orphaned children living under the same conditions. We also examine the impacts of various family structures and compare social orphans (non-orphaned children not living with a biological parent) to orphans. Using household fixed-effects estimation, we provide evidence that children not living with a biological parent lag behind in education and are more often malnourished and stunted. Educational gaps are particularly evident among orphans and social orphans not living with a mother. The effect of paternal death or absence is rather modest in most countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Coneus, Katja & Mühlenweg, Andrea M., 2011. "Orphans at risk in Sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence on educational and health outcomes," ZEW Discussion Papers 11-008, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:11008
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrea M. Mühlenweg & Franz G. Westermaier & Brant Morefield, 2016. "Parental health and child behavior: evidence from parental health shocks," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 577-598, September.
    2. Clifford Odimegwu & Oluwaseyi Dolapo Somefun & Joshua Akinyemi, 2017. "Gender Differences in the Effect of Family Structure on Educational Outcomes Among Nigerian Youth," SAGE Open, , vol. 7(4), pages 21582440177, November.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Orphans; family structure; human capital; sub-Saharan Africa; fixed-effects;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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