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Poverty, AIDS, Orphanhood, Gender, and Child Schooling in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Review of the Evidence

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  • Mather, David

Abstract

There is growing concern that the HIV/AIDS epidemic may reduce long-term human capital development through reductions in child schooling in SSA, thus severely limiting the longterm ability of orphans and their extended families to escape poverty. In response, some have called for targeted schooling subsidies for orphans and other children made vulnerable by HIV/AIDS, on the assumption that such children are under-enrolled. This paper provides an overview of the data sources used by existing empirical studies that test for orphan schooling deficits and the methodological challenges that they face. It then reviews the empirical evidence on the effects of orphan status or adult mortality on child schooling, as well as the prevalence of orphans in SSA and their living arrangements.

Suggested Citation

  • Mather, David, 2011. "Poverty, AIDS, Orphanhood, Gender, and Child Schooling in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Review of the Evidence," Food Security International Development Working Papers 119319, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midiwp:119319
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mather, David & Donovan, Cynthia, 2008. "The Impacts of Prime-Age Adult Mortality on Rural Household Income, Assets, and Poverty in Mozambique," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 56071, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    2. Martha Ainsworth & Kathleen Beegle & Godlike Koda, 2005. "The Impact of Adult Mortality and Parental Deaths on Primary Schooling in North-Western Tanzania," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(3), pages 412-439.
    3. Sharma, Manohar P., 2006. "Orphanhood and Schooling Outcomes in Malawi," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25666, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Yamano, Takashi & Jayne, T S, 2005. "Working-Age Adult Mortality and Primary School Attendance in Rural Kenya," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(3), pages 619-653, April.
    5. Cally Ardington & Murray Leibbrandt, 2010. "Orphanhood and Schooling in South Africa: Trends in the Vulnerability of Orphans between 1993 and 2005," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 58(3), pages 507-536, April.
    6. Yamauchi, Futoshi & Buthelezi, Thabani & Velia, Myriam, 2006. "Gender, labor, and prime-age adult mortality: evidence from South Africa," FCND discussion papers 208, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Mather, David & Donovan, Cynthia & Weber, Michael T. & de Marrule, Higino Francisco & Alage, Albertina, 2004. "Household Responses to Prime Age Adult Mortality in Rural Mozambique: Implications for HIV/AIDS Mitigation Efforts and Rural Economic Development Policies," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 56060, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    8. Himaz, Rozana, 2009. "The impact of parental death on schooling and subjective wellbeing: Evidence from Ethiopia using longitudinal data," MPRA Paper 21735, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Kathleen Beegle & Joachim De Weerdt & Stefan Dercon, 2006. "Orphanhood and the Long-Run Impact on Children," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 88(5), pages 1266-1272.
    10. Simon Gregson & Heather Waddell & Stephen Chandiwana, 2001. "School education and HIV control in sub-Saharan Africa: from discord to harmony?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(4), pages 467-485.
    11. Paul Bennell, 2005. "The Impact of the AIDS Epidemic on the Schooling of Orphans and Other Directly Affected Children in Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(3), pages 467-488.
    12. Manohar P. Sharma, 2006. "Orphanhood and Schooling Outcomes in Malawi," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 88(5), pages 1273-1278.
    13. David Evans & Edward Miguel, 2007. "Orphans and schooling in africa: a longitudinal analysis," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 44(1), pages 35-57, February.
    14. Yamano, Takashi & Shimamura, Yasuharu & Sserunkuuma, Dick, 2006. "Living Arrangements and Schooling of Orphaned Children and Adolescents in Uganda," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 54(4), pages 833-856, July.
    15. Frederick J. Zimmerman, 2003. "Cinderella Goes to School: The Effects of Child Fostering on School Enrollment in South Africa," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 38(3).
    16. Anne Case & Cally Ardington, 2006. "The impact of parental death on school outcomes: Longitudinal evidence from South Africa," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 43(3), pages 401-420, August.
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    Keywords

    HIV/AIDS; child schooling; Poverty; Sub-Saharan Africa; Food Security and Poverty;

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