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Citations of

Kai Zhao

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Zhao, Kai, 2011. "Social security and the rise in health spending: a macroeconomic analysis," MPRA Paper 34203, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Social security and the increase in US health care costs
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2011-12-12 15:12:00
  2. Kai Zhao, 2013. "Health Insurance, Annuities, and Public Policy," UWO Department of Economics Working Papers 20131, University of Western Ontario, Department of Economics.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Health Insurance, Annuities, and Public Policy
      by Christian Zimmermann in NEP-DGE blog on 2013-04-02 19:51:39

Working papers

  1. Kai Zhao, 2016. "Social Insurance, Private Health Insurance and Individual Welfare," Working papers 2016-01, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Kai Zhao, 2014. "The impact of the correlation between health expenditure and survival probability on the demand for insurance," Working papers 2014-37, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.

  2. Yonghong An & Kai Zhao & Rong Zhou, 2014. "Health Spending and Public Pension: Evidence from Panel Data," Working papers 2014-27, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Niklas Potrafke, 2016. "Partisan Politics: The Empirical Evidence from OECD Panel Studies," CESifo Working Paper Series 6024, CESifo Group Munich.

  3. Kai Zhao, 2014. "Social Security and the Rise in Health Spending," Working papers 2014-04, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Shantanu Bagchi, 2014. "Can Removing the Tax Cap Save Social Security?," Working Papers 2014-05, Towson University, Department of Economics, revised May 2016.
    2. Schneider, Maik & Winkler, Ralph, 2013. "Growth and Welfare under Endogenous Lifetime," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 80018, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    3. Yonghong An & Kai Zhao & Rong Zhou, 2014. "Health Spending and Public Pension: Evidence from Panel Data," Working papers 2014-27, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    4. Hui He & Kevin x.d. Huang, 2013. "Why Do Americans Spend So Much More on Health Care than Europeans?--A General Equilibrium Macroeconomic Analysis," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 13-00005, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
    5. Bagchi, Shantanu, 2016. "Is The Social Security Crisis Really As Bad As We Think?," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(03), pages 737-776, April.
    6. Kevin x.d. Huang & Hui He, 2015. "Why Do Americans Spend So Much More on Health Care than Europeans?," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 15-00003, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
    7. Ivan Frankovic & Michael Kuhn & Stefan Wrzaczek, 2016. "Medical Care within an OLG Economy with Realistic Demography," Working Papers 1603, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna.
    8. Zhigang Feng & Kai Zhao, 2015. "Employment-Based Health Insurance and Aggregate Labor Supply," Working papers 2015-11, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    9. Bouyon, Sylvain, 2014. "A Review of Policy Options for Monitoring Household Saving," ECRI Papers 9754, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    10. Shantanu Bagchi, 2016. "Differential Mortality and the Progressivity of Social Security," Working Papers 2016-03, Towson University, Department of Economics, revised Aug 2016.
    11. Juergen Jung & Chung Tran & Matthew Chambers, 2016. "Aging and Health Financing in the US: A General Equilibrium Analysis," Working Papers 2016-04, Towson University, Department of Economics, revised Jul 2016.
    12. Kevin x.d. Huang & Hui He & Sheng-ti Hung, 2013. "Substituting Leisure for Health Expenditure: A General Equilibrium-Based Empirical Investigation," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 13-00020, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
    13. Ponpoje (Poe) Porapakkarm & Svetlana Pashchenko, 2013. "Cross-subsidization in employer-based health insurance and the effects of tax subsidy reform," 2013 Meeting Papers 1086, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    14. Kai Zhao, 2016. "Social Insurance, Private Health Insurance and Individual Welfare," Working papers 2016-01, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    15. Shantanu Bagchi, 2014. "Labor Supply and the Optimality of Social Security," Working Papers 2014-04, Towson University, Department of Economics, revised Sep 2014.
    16. Kevin X. D. Huang & Gregory W. Huffman, 2010. "A Defense of the Current US Tax Treatment of Employer-Provided Medical Insurance," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 1001, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
    17. He, Hui & Huang, Kevin X. D. & Hung, Sheng-Ti, 2014. "Are Recessions Good for Your Health? When Ruhm Meets GHH," Dynare Working Papers 31, CEPREMAP.

  4. Kai Zhao, 2014. "The impact of the correlation between health expenditure and survival probability on the demand for insurance," Working papers 2014-37, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Ferreira, Pedro Cavalcanti & Gomes, Diego Braz Pereira, 2016. "Health Care Reform or More Affordable Health Care?," Economics Working Papers (Ensaios Economicos da EPGE) 780, FGV/EPGE Escola Brasileira de Economia e Finanças, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil).

  5. Kai Zhao, 2013. "War Finance and the Baby Boom," Working papers 2013-25, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Jeremy Greenwood & Nezih Guner & Guillaume Vandenbroucke, 2016. "Family Economics Writ Large," Working Papers 2016-021, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    2. Matthias Doepke & Moshe Hazan & Yishay D. Maoz, 2008. "The Baby Boom and World War II: A Macroeconomic Analysis," IEW - Working Papers 355, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.

  6. Zhao, Kai, 2011. "War Debt and the Baby Boom," MPRA Paper 36330, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Kai Zhao, 2009. "Social Security, Differential Fertility, and the Dynamics of the Earnings Distribution," UWO Department of Economics Working Papers 20091, University of Western Ontario, Department of Economics.
    2. Fanti, Luciano & Spataro, Luca, 2013. "On the relationship between fertility and public national debt," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 843-849.

  7. Zhao, Kai, 2011. "Social security and the rise in health spending: a macroeconomic analysis," MPRA Paper 34203, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Timothy Halliday & Hui He & Hao Zhang, 2012. "Health Investment over the Life-Cycle," Working Papers 201210, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
    2. Shantanu Bagchi, 2014. "Labor Supply and the Optimality of Social Security," Working Papers 2014-04, Towson University, Department of Economics, revised Sep 2014.
    3. Shantanu Bagchi & James Feigenbaum, 2014. "Is Smoking a Fiscal Good?," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 17(1), pages 170-190, January.

  8. Kai Zhao, 2009. "Social Security, Differential Fertility, and the Dynamics of the Earnings Distribution," UWO Department of Economics Working Papers 20091, University of Western Ontario, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Larry E. Jones & Alice Schoonbroodt & Michèle Tertilt, 2010. "Fertility Theories: Can They Explain the Negative Fertility-Income Relationship?," NBER Chapters, in: Demography and the Economy, pages 43-100 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Michele Tertilt, 2010. "Who Owns Children and Does it Matter?," Discussion Papers 09-003, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    3. Kai Zhao, 2014. "War Finance and the Baby Boom," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 17(3), pages 459-473, July.
    4. ELOUNDOU-ENYEGUE Parfait & TENIKUE Michel & KANDIWA Vongai M., 2013. "Population Contributions to Global Income Inequality: A Fuller Account," LISER Working Paper Series 2013-28, LISER.
    5. Daishin Yasui, 2014. "A Theory of the Cross-Sectional Fertility Differential: Jobs f Heterogeneity Approach," Discussion Papers 1409, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.
    6. Kai(Jackie) Zhao, 2009. "War Debt and the Baby Boom," 2009 Meeting Papers 856, Society for Economic Dynamics.

Articles

  1. Yonghong An & Kai Zhao & Rong Zhou, 2016. "Health spending and public pension: evidence from panel data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(11), pages 987-1004, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Zhao, Kai, 2015. "The impact of the correlation between health expenditure and survival probability on the demand for insurance," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 98-111.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Zhao, Kai, 2014. "Social security and the rise in health spending," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 21-37.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Kai Zhao, 2014. "War Finance and the Baby Boom," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 17(3), pages 459-473, July.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  5. Zhao Kai, 2011. "Social Security, Differential Fertility, and the Dynamics of the Earnings Distribution," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 11(1), pages 1-31, August. See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

Software components

    Sorry, no citations of software components recorded.
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