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Retirement in the Shadow (Banking)

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  • Guillermo Ordoñez
  • Facundo Piguillem

Abstract

The U.S. economy has recently experienced two, seemingly unrelated, phenomena: a large increase in post-retirement life expectancy and a major expansion in securitization and shadow banking activities. We argue they are intimately related. Agents rely on financial intermediaries to save for post-retirement consumption. When expecting to live longer, they rely more heavily on intermediaries that use securitization, with riskier but higher returns. A quantitative evaluation of the model shows the potential of the demographic transition to account for a boom in credit and output, but only when it triggers a more extensive use of securitization and shadow banking.

Suggested Citation

  • Guillermo Ordoñez & Facundo Piguillem, 2019. "Retirement in the Shadow (Banking)," NBER Working Papers 26337, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:26337
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    Cited by:

    1. Guillermo Ordoñez & Facundo Piguillem, 2020. "Savings and Saving Rates: Up or Down?," NBER Working Papers 27179, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Ari, Anil & Darracq Pariès, Matthieu & Kok, Christoffer & Żochowski, Dawid, 2016. "When shadows grow longer: shadow banking with endogenous entry," Working Paper Series 1943, European Central Bank.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts

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