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Financial Regulation in a Quantitative Model of the Modern Banking System

Author

Listed:
  • Tim Landvoigt

    (University of Texas Austin)

  • Juliane Begenau

    (Harvard Business School)

Abstract

This paper builds a quantitative general equilibrium model with commercial banks and shadow banks to study the unintended consequences of capital requirements. In particular, we investigate how the shadow banking system responds to capital regulation changes for traditional banks. A key feature of our model are defaultable bank liabilities that provide liquidity services to households. In case of default, commercial bank debt is fully insured and thus provides full liquidity services. In contrast, shadow banks are only randomly bailed out. Thus, shadow banks' liquidity services also depend on their default rate. Commercial banks are subject to a capital requirement. Tightening the requirement from the status quo, leads households to substitute shadow bank liquidity for commercial bank liquidity and therefore to more shadow banking activity in the economy. But this relationship is non-monotonic due to an endogenous leverage constraint on shadow banks that limits their ability to deliver liquidity services. The basic trade-off of a higher requirement is between bank liquidity provision and stability. Calibrating the model to data from the Financial Accounts of the U.S., the optimal capital requirement is around 20\%.

Suggested Citation

  • Tim Landvoigt & Juliane Begenau, 2016. "Financial Regulation in a Quantitative Model of the Modern Banking System," 2016 Meeting Papers 1462, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed016:1462
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Financial Regulation in a Quantitative Model of the Modern Banking System
      by Christian Zimmermann in NEP-DGE blog on 2016-11-30 03:33:00
    2. Setting Bank Capital Requirements
      by Steve Cecchetti and Kim Schoenholtz in Money, Banking and Financial Markets on 2020-10-12 11:41:47

    Citations

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    Cited by:

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    2. Tatiana Damjanovic & Vladislav Damjanovic & Charles Nolan, 2020. "Default, Bailouts and the Vertical Structure of Financial Intermediaries," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 38, pages 154-180, October.
    3. Stefan Gebauer & Falk Mazelis, 2019. "Macroprudential Regulation and Leakage to the Shadow Banking Sector," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1814, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    4. Kai Ding & Enoch Hill & David Perez-Reyna, 2021. "Optimal capital requirements with noisy signals on banking risk," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 71(4), pages 1649-1687, June.
    5. Sebastian Di Tella & Pablo Kurlat, 2021. "Why Are Banks Exposed to Monetary Policy?," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 13(4), pages 295-340, October.
    6. Gebauer Stefan, 2021. "Welfare-Based Optimal Macroprudential Policy with Shadow Banks," Working papers 817, Banque de France.
    7. Eric Jondeau & Jean-Guillaume Sahuc, 2018. "A General Equilibrium Appraisal of Capital Shortfall," Swiss Finance Institute Research Paper Series 18-12, Swiss Finance Institute, revised Feb 2018.
    8. Miguel Faria-e-Castro, 2019. "A Quantitative Analysis of Countercyclical Capital Buffers," Working Papers 2019-008, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, revised 01 Jan 2020.
    9. Zhang, Xue & Poeschl, Johannes, 2017. "Bank Capital Regulation in a Model of Modern Banking Crises," VfS Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168275, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    10. Federico Lubello & Abdelaziz Rouabah, 2017. "Capturing macroprudential regulation effectiveness: A DSGE approach with shadow intermediaries," BCL working papers 114, Central Bank of Luxembourg.
    11. Magill, Michael & Quinzii, Martine & Rochet, Jean-Charles, 2020. "The safe asset, banking equilibrium, and optimal central bank monetary, prudential and balance-sheet policies," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 113-128.
    12. Gebauer, Stefan & Mazelis, Falk, 2018. "The Role of Shadow Banking for Financial Regulation," VfS Annual Conference 2018 (Freiburg, Breisgau): Digital Economy 181581, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    13. Brian S. Chen & Samuel G. Hanson & Jeremy C. Stein, 2017. "The Decline of Big-Bank Lending to Small Business: Dynamic Impacts on Local Credit and Labor Markets," NBER Working Papers 23843, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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