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Phasing out the GSEs

Author

Listed:
  • Tim Landvoigt

    (UT Austin)

  • Stijn Van Nieuwerburgh

    (NYU Stern School of Business)

  • Vadim Elenev

    (NYU Stern)

Abstract

We develop a new model of the mortgage market where both borrowers and lenders can default. Risk tolerant savers (risk takers) act as intermediaries between risk averse depositors and impatient borrowers. The government provides mortgage guarantees and deposit insurance. Underpriced government guarantees lead to risky mortgage origination and excessive financial sector leverage. Mortgage crises frequently turn into financial crises and government bailouts due to the fragility of the intermediaries' balance sheets. Increasing the price of the mortgage guarantee crowds in the private sector, reduces financial fragility, leads to less and safer mortgage lending, lowers house prices, raises mortgage rates and risk-free interest rates. It also makes all agents in the economy strictly better off. The welfare gains are particularly large for the risk takers so that the private market solution increases wealth inequality.

Suggested Citation

  • Tim Landvoigt & Stijn Van Nieuwerburgh & Vadim Elenev, 2015. "Phasing out the GSEs," 2015 Meeting Papers 977, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed015:977
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E0 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • G00 - Financial Economics - - General - - - General
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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