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The Housing Market(s) of San Diego

Author

Listed:
  • Tim Landvoigt
  • Monika Piazzesi
  • Martin Schneider

Abstract

This paper uses an assignment model to understand the cross section of house prices within a metro area. Movers' demand for housing is derived from a lifecycle problem with credit market frictions. Equilibrium house prices adjust to assign houses that differ by quality to movers who differ by age, income and wealth. To quantify the model, we measure distributions of house prices, house qualities and mover characteristics from micro data on San Diego County during the 2000s boom. The main result is that cheaper credit for poor households was a major driver of prices, especially at the low end of the market.

Suggested Citation

  • Tim Landvoigt & Monika Piazzesi & Martin Schneider, 2012. "The Housing Market(s) of San Diego," NBER Working Papers 17723, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:17723
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Craig Burnside & Martin Eichenbaum & Sergio Rebelo, 2016. "Understanding Booms and Busts in Housing Markets," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 124(4), pages 1088-1147.
    2. Jack Favilukis & Sydney C. Ludvigson & Stijn Van Nieuwerburgh, 2017. "The Macroeconomic Effects of Housing Wealth, Housing Finance, and Limited Risk Sharing in General Equilibrium," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 125(1), pages 140-223.
    3. Kenneth L. Judd, 1998. "Numerical Methods in Economics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262100711, January.
    4. Patrick Bayer & Fernando Ferreira & Robert McMillan, 2007. "A Unified Framework for Measuring Preferences for Schools and Neighborhoods," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 115(4), pages 588-638, August.
    5. Nobuhiro Kiyotaki & Alexander Michaelides & Kalin Nikolov, 2011. "Winners and Losers in Housing Markets," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 43, pages 255-296, March.
    6. Caplin, Andrew & Leahy, John, 2014. "A graph theoretic approach to markets for indivisible goods," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 112-122.
    7. Atif Mian & Amir Sufi, 2009. "The Consequences of Mortgage Credit Expansion: Evidence from the U.S. Mortgage Default Crisis," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(4), pages 1449-1496.
    8. Chatterjee, Satyajit & Eyigungor, Burcu, 2009. "Foreclosures and house price dynamics: a quantitative analysis of the mortgage crisis and the foreclosure prevention policy," Working Papers 09-22, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Loayza,Norman V. & Ouazad,Amine & Ranciere,Romain, 2017. "Financial development, growth, and crisis: is there a trade-off ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 8237, The World Bank.
    2. Elenev, Vadim & Landvoigt, Tim & Van Nieuwerburgh, Stijn, 2016. "Phasing out the GSEs," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 111-132.
    3. Sumit Agarwal & Gene Amromin & Itzhak Ben-David & Souphala Chomsisengphet & Tomasz Piskorski & Amit Seru, 2017. "Policy Intervention in Debt Renegotiation: Evidence from the Home Affordable Modification Program," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 125(3), pages 654-712.
    4. Giorgio Primiceri & Andrea Tambalotti & Alejandro Justiniano, 2017. "The Mortgage Rate Conundrum," 2017 Meeting Papers 471, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Gaign�, Carl & Koster, Hans R.A. & Moizeau, Fabien & Thisse, Jacques-Fran�ois, 2017. "Amenities and the Social Structure of Cities," CEPR Discussion Papers 11958, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Piazzesi, M. & Schneider, M., 2016. "Housing and Macroeconomics," Handbook of Macroeconomics, Elsevier.
    7. Dominik Menno & Tommaso Oliviero, 2014. "Financial Intermediation, House Prices and the Welfare Effects of the U.S. Great Recession," CSEF Working Papers 373, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy, revised 04 Oct 2016.
    8. Atif Mian & Amir Sufi & Emil Verner, 2017. "Household Debt and Business Cycles Worldwide," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 132(4), pages 1755-1817.
    9. Diego Escobari & Damian Damianov & Andres Bello, 2015. "A time series test to identify housing bubbles," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 39(1), pages 136-152, January.
    10. Määttänen, Niku & Terviö, Marko, 2014. "Income distribution and housing prices: An assignment model approach," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 151(C), pages 381-410.
    11. repec:eee:juecon:v:99:y:2017:i:c:p:120-135 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Bulent Guler, 2015. "Innovations in Information Technology and the Mortgage Market," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 18(3), pages 456-483, July.
    13. Yongqiang Chu, 2014. "Credit constraints, inelastic supply, and the housing boom," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 17(1), pages 52-69, January.
    14. Marcin Bielecki & Michał Brzoza-Brzezina & Marcin Kolasa & Krzysztof Makarski, 2017. "Could the boom-bust in the eurozone periphery have been prevented?," GRAPE Working Papers 17, GRAPE Group for Research in Applied Economics.
    15. Marcelo M. de Oliveira & Alexandre C. L. Almeida, 2014. "Testing for rational speculative bubbles in the Brazilian residential real-estate market," Papers 1401.7615, arXiv.org.
    16. Lars Nesheim & Florian Oswald & Jonathan Halket, 2015. "A Selection Model of Hedonic House Values and Rents," 2015 Meeting Papers 961, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    17. Eugene Amromin & Jennifer Huang & Clemens Sialm & Edward Zhong, 2010. "Complex mortgages," Working Paper Series WP-2010-17, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    18. Rüth, Sebastian & Bachmann, Rüdiger, 2016. "Systematic Monetary Policy and the Macroeconomic Effects of Shifts in Loan-to-Value Ratios," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145826, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    19. Amine Ouazad & Romain Rancière, 2017. "City Equilibrium with Borrowing Constraints: Structural Estimation and General Equilibrium Effects," NBER Working Papers 23994, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    20. Martin Schneider, 2015. "Comment on "Demystifying the Chinese Housing Boom"," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2015, Volume 30, pages 167-175 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    21. Liu, Crocker H. & Nowak, Adam & Rosenthal, Stuart S., 2016. "Housing price bubbles, new supply, and within-city dynamics," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 55-72.
    22. Damian S. Damianov & Diego Escobari, 2016. "Long-run Equilibrium Shift and Short-run Dynamics of U.S. Home Price Tiers During the Housing Bubble," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 53(1), pages 1-28, July.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • R20 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - General

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