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The Housing Market(s) of San Diego

  • Tim Landvoigt
  • Monika Piazzesi
  • Martin Schneider

This paper uses an assignment model to understand the cross section of house prices within a metro area. Movers' demand for housing is derived from a lifecycle problem with credit market frictions. Equilibrium house prices adjust to assign houses that differ by quality to movers who differ by age, income and wealth. To quantify the model, we measure distributions of house prices, house qualities and mover characteristics from micro data on San Diego County during the 2000s boom. The main result is that cheaper credit for poor households was a major driver of prices, especially at the low end of the market.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w17723.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 17723.

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Date of creation: Jan 2012
Date of revision:
Publication status: published as “The Housing Market(s) of San Diego” (with Tim Landvoigt and Martin Schneider) American Economic Review, conditionally accepted
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:17723
Note: AP EFG ME
Contact details of provider: Postal: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
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Web page: http://www.nber.org
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  1. Patrick Bayer & Fernando Ferreira & Robert McMillan, 2007. "A Unified Framework for Measuring Preferences for Schools and Neighborhoods," Working Papers 07-27, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  2. Sergio Rebelo & Martin Eichenbaum & Craig Burnside, 2012. "Understanding Booms and Busts in Housing Markets," 2012 Meeting Papers 114, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  3. Caplin, Andrew & Leahy, John, 2014. "A graph theoretic approach to markets for indivisible goods," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 112-122.
  4. Nobuhiro Kiyotaki & Alexander Michaelides & Kalin Nikolov, 2011. "Winners and Losers in Housing Markets," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 43, pages 255-296, 03.
  5. Jack Favilukis & Sydney C. Ludvigson & Stijn Van Nieuwerburgh, 2010. "The Macroeconomic Effects of Housing Wealth, Housing Finance, and Limited Risk-Sharing in General Equilibrium," NBER Working Papers 15988, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Kenneth L. Judd, 1998. "Numerical Methods in Economics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262100711, June.
  7. Chatterjee, Satyajit & Eyigungor, Burcu, 2009. "Foreclosures and house price dynamics: a quantitative analysis of the mortgage crisis and the foreclosure prevention policy," Working Papers 09-22, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
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