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Understanding Booms and Busts in Housing Markets

Author

Listed:
  • Sergio Rebelo

    (Northwestern University)

  • Martin Eichenbaum

    (Northwestern University)

  • Craig Burnside

    (Duke University)

Abstract

Some booms in housing prices are followed by busts. Others are not. In either case it is difficult to find observable fundamentals that are correlated with price movements. We develop a model consistent with these observations. Agents have heterogeneous expectations about long-run fundamentals but change their views because of "social dynamics." Agents meet randomly. Those with tighter priors are more likely to convert others to their beliefs. The model generates a "fad": the fraction of the population with a particular view rises and then falls. Depending on which agent is correct about fundamentals, these fads generate boom-busts or protracted booms.

Suggested Citation

  • Sergio Rebelo & Martin Eichenbaum & Craig Burnside, 2012. "Understanding Booms and Busts in Housing Markets," 2012 Meeting Papers 114, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed012:114
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • R31 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Housing Supply and Markets

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