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Market Contagion: Evidence from the Panics of 1854 and 1857

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  • Kelly, M.
  • O'Grada, C.

Abstract

To test a model of contagion -where individuals hear some bad news and communicate it to their acquaintances, who pass it on in turn, leading to a market panic- requires a knowledge of the information networks of market participants, something hitherto unavailable. For two panics in the 1850s this paper examines the bahaviour of Irish depositors in a New York bank.

Suggested Citation

  • Kelly, M. & O'Grada, C., 1999. "Market Contagion: Evidence from the Panics of 1854 and 1857," Papers 99/19, College Dublin, Department of Political Economy-.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:dublec:99/19
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Eugene N. White & Cormac Ó Gráda, 2002. "Who panics during panics? Evidence from a nineteenth century savings bank," Working Papers 200212, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    BANKS ; FINANCIAL MARKET ; ECONOMIC HISTORY;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • N21 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - U.S.; Canada: Pre-1913

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