IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cpr/ceprdp/12373.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Shadow Banking and the Four Pillars of Traditional Financial Intermediation

Author

Listed:
  • Farhi, Emmanuel
  • Tirole, Jean

Abstract

Traditional banking is built on four pillars: SME lending, access to public liquidity, deposit insurance, and prudential supervision. This vision has been shattered by repeated bailouts of shadow financial institutions. This paper puts "special depositors and borrowers'" at the core of the analysis, provides a rationale for the covariation yielding the quadrilogy, and analyzes how prudential regulation must adjust to the possibility of migration toward less regulated spheres. Ring fencing between regulated and shadow banking and the sharing of liquidity in centralized platforms are motivated by the supervision of syphoning and financial contagion.

Suggested Citation

  • Farhi, Emmanuel & Tirole, Jean, 2017. "Shadow Banking and the Four Pillars of Traditional Financial Intermediation," CEPR Discussion Papers 12373, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:12373
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.cepr.org/active/publications/discussion_papers/dp.php?dpno=12373
    Download Restriction: CEPR Discussion Papers are free to download for our researchers, subscribers and members. If you fall into one of these categories but have trouble downloading our papers, please contact us at subscribers@cepr.org

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Nicola Gennaioli & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 2013. "A Model of Shadow Banking," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 68(4), pages 1331-1363, August.
    2. Gertler, M. & Kiyotaki, N. & Prestipino, A., 2016. "Wholesale Banking and Bank Runs in Macroeconomic Modeling of Financial Crises," Handbook of Macroeconomics, Elsevier.
    3. Buchak, Greg & Matvos, Gregor & Piskorski, Tomasz & Seru, Amit, 2017. "Fintech, Regulatory Arbitrage, and the Rise of Shadow Banks," Research Papers 3511, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
    4. Samuel G. Hanson & Anil K. Kashyap & Jeremy C. Stein, 2011. "A Macroprudential Approach to Financial Regulation," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 25(1), pages 3-28, Winter.
    5. Grochulski, Borys & Zhang, Yuzhe, 2015. "Optimal Liquidity Regulation With Shadow Banking," Working Paper 15-12, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, revised 15 Oct 2015.
    6. Xisong Jin & Francisco Nadal De Simone, 2016. "Tracking Changes in the Intensity of Financial Sector's Systemic Risk," BCL working papers 102, Central Bank of Luxembourg.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    CCPs.; deposit insurance; lender of last resort; migration; Retail and shadow banks; ring fencing; Supervision;

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:12373. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.