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Markets, Banks, and Shadow Banks

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We analyze the effect of bank capital requirements on the structure and risk of a financial system where markets, regulated banks, and shadow banks coexist. Banks face a moral hazard problem in screening entrepreneurs' projects, and they choose whether to be regulated or not. If regulated, a supervisor certifies their capital; if not, they have to rely on more expensive private certification. Under both risk-insensitive and risk-sensitive requirements, safer entrepreneurs borrow from the market and riskier entrepreneurs borrow from banks. But risk-insensitive (sensitive) requirements are especially costly for relatively safe (risky) entrepreneurs, which may shift from regulated to shadow banks.

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  • David Martinez-Miera & Rafael Repullo, 2018. "Markets, Banks, and Shadow Banks," Working Papers wp2018_1811, CEMFI.
  • Handle: RePEc:cmf:wpaper:wp2018_1811
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ping-Lun Tseng & Wen-Chung Guo, 2022. "Fintech, Credit Market Competition, and Bank Asset Quality," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 61(3), pages 285-318, June.
    2. Ndwiga, David, 2020. "The effects of FinTechs on bank market power and risk taking behaviour in Kenya," KBA Centre for Research on Financial Markets and Policy Working Paper Series 44, Kenya Bankers Association (KBA).
    3. Irani, Rustom & Iyer, Rajkamal & Meisenzahl, Ralf & Peydró, José-Luis, 2021. "The rise of shadow banking: Evidence from capital regulation," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 2181-2235.
    4. Anatoli Segura & Alonso Villacorta, 2020. "Demand for safety, risky loans: A model of securitization," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1260, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    5. Irani, Rustom & Iyer, Rajkamal & Meisenzahl, Ralf & Peydró, José-Luis, 2021. "The rise of shadow banking: Evidence from capital regulation," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 2181-2235.
    6. David Martinez-Miera & Rafael Repullo, 2019. "Monetary Policy, Macroprudential Policy, and Financial Stability," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 11(1), pages 809-832, August.
    7. Olivier de Bandt & Bora Durdu & Hibiki Ichiue & Yasin Mimir & Jolan Mohimont & Kalin Nikolov & Sigrid Roehrs & Jean-Guillaume Sahuc & Valerio Scalone & Michael Straughan, 2022. "Assessing the Impact of Basel III: Evidence from Structural Macroeconomic Models," Working papers 864, Banque de France.
    8. Windl, Martin, 2020. "Can Fintechs Stabilize the Financial Sector?," VfS Annual Conference 2020 (Virtual Conference): Gender Economics 224622, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    9. Eduardo Dávila & Ansgar Walther, 2021. "Corrective Regulation with Imperfect Instruments," NBER Working Papers 29160, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Matt Darst & Ehraz Refayet & Alexandros Vardoulakis, 2020. "Banks, Non Banks, and Lending Standards," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2020-086, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Bank regulation; bank supervision; capital requirements; credit screening; credit spreads; loan defaults; optimal regulation; market finance; shadow banks.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G23 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Non-bank Financial Institutions; Financial Instruments; Institutional Investors
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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