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Productivity and Potential Output before, during, and after the Great Recession

In: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2014, Volume 29

Listed author(s):
  • John G. Fernald

U.S. labor and total-factor productivity growth slowed prior to the Great Recession. The timing rules out explanations that focus on disruptions during or since the recession, and industry and state data rule out "bubble economy" stories related to housing or finance. The slowdown is located in industries that produce information technology (IT) or that use IT intensively, consistent with a return to normal productivity growth after nearly a decade of exceptional IT-fueled gains. A calibrated growth model suggests trend productivity growth has returned close to its 1973-1995 pace. Slower underlying productivity growth implies less economic slack than recently estimated by the Congressional Budget Office. As of 2013, about ¾ of the shortfall of actual output from (overly optimistic) pre-recession trends reflects a reduction in the level of potential.

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This chapter was published in:
  • Jonathan A. Parker & Michael Woodford, 2015. "NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2014, Volume 29," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number park14-1.
  • This item is provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Chapters with number 13407.
    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:13407
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