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Productivity Growth and the New Economy

  • William D. Nordhaus

    (Yale University)

The present study is the third in a series of three papers devoted to issues in the measurement of productivity and productivity growth. The major findings are as follows. First, this study shows that the new data set used here, which develops data on total output, business sector output, and "well-measured" output, and relying on income-side data, provides a useful supplement to existing data sets. Second, there has clearly been a rebound in labor-productivity growth in recent years. All three sectoral definitions show a major acceleration in labor productivity in the last three years of the period (1996-98) relative to the 1978-95 period. The rebound was 1.2 percentage points for GDP, 1.8 percentage points for business sector, and 2.1 percentage points for well-measured output. Third, productivity growth in the new economy sectors has made a significant contribution to economy-wide productivity growth. For the business sector, of the 1.82 percentage point increase in labor-productivity growth in the last three years, 0.65 percentage point was due to the new-economy sectors. Finally, for all three output measures, there has been a substantial upturn in labor-productivity growth outside the new economy. After removing the direct effect of new economy sectors, the productivity acceleration was 0.54 percentage points for total GDP, 0.65 percentage points for business output, and 1.18 percentage points for well- measured output. It is clear that the productivity rebound is not narrowly focused in a few new-economy sectors.

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File URL: http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/Files/Programs/ES/BPEA/2002_2_bpea_papers/2002b_bpea_nordhaus.pdf
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Article provided by Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution in its journal Brookings Papers on Economic Activity.

Volume (Year): 33 (2002)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 211-265

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Handle: RePEc:bin:bpeajo:v:33:y:2002:i:2002-2:p:211-265
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  1. William D. Nordhaus, 1972. "The Recent Productivity Slowdown," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 3(3), pages 493-546.
  2. Dale W. Jorgenson & Mun S. Ho & Kevin J. Stiroh, 2002. "Projecting productivity growth: lessons from the U.S. growth resurgence," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Q3, pages 1-13.
  3. Lucia Foster & John Haltiwanger & C.J. Krizan, 2002. "The Link Between Aggregate and Micro Productivity Growth: Evidence from Retail Trade," NBER Working Papers 9120, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Basu, Susanto & Fernald, John G., 1995. "Are apparent productive spillovers a figment of specification error?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 165-188, August.
  5. Dale W. Jorgenson & Kevin J. Stiroh, 2000. "Raising the Speed Limit: U.S. Economic Growth in the Information Age," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 31(1), pages 125-236.
  6. Martin Neil Baily, 1982. "The Productivity Growth Slowdown by Industry," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 13(2), pages 423-459.
  7. Robert J. Gordon, 1993. "The Jobless Recovery: Does It Signal a New Era of Productivity-led Growth?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 24(1), pages 271-316.
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