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Growth of US Industries and Investments in Information Technology and Higher Education

  • Dale Jorgenson
  • Mun Ho
  • Kevin Stiroh

This paper presents new data on the sources of growth for the US economy over the period 1977-2000. Our principal innovation is the incorporation of detailed information for individual industries, including those involved in the production of information technology equipment and software. We show that economic growth is dominated by investments in information technology and higher education, both for individual industries and the economy as a whole. We also show that a jump in information technology investment, gains in the employment of college-educated workers, and the revival of productivity growth account for the resurgence of the US economy since 1995.

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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Economic Systems Research.

Volume (Year): 15 (2003)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 279-325

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Handle: RePEc:taf:ecsysr:v:15:y:2003:i:3:p:279-325
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